Polynesian+Tattooing

Polynesian+Tattooing - Polynesian Tattooing 1 Polynesian...

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Polynesian Tattooing 1 Polynesian Tattooing Your Name Axia College of University of Phoenix COM 150 Effective Essay Writing Your Teacher October 5, 2008
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Polynesian Tattooing 2
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Polynesian Tattooing Polynesian tattooing is one of the oldest tattooing methods that has survived though generations and is still practiced in today’s society. In the 19 th century this unusual art was on the decline due to the western missionary’s arrival to the islands. When this occurred artists then had to maintain their vital link to their society’s traditions. Although some people view tattoos as simple markings, the Polynesian people use tattooing to celebrate their history and culture. Polynesian tattooing is a historic art which has been around for hundreds, even thousands of years. The word tattoo originated from the Polynesian word tatau which came from the sound that the tapping of sticks made while tattooing. Polynesia is a Greek word meaning many islands. The group of islands referred to as Polynesia is made up of about one thousand islands, which are spread over the Pacific Ocean. Mendana was a Spanish explorer which sailed the Pacific Ocean and discovered the Fenua Enana Islands in 1595. History has dictated that Mendana baptized the Marquises Islands after his discovery. The first descriptions of Polynesian tattooing, which were documented nearly two hundred years later by English Captain Samuel Wallis, English Captain Cook and French explorer Bougainville (“The revival,” 2008). Samuel Wallis was noticing that tattooing was a traditional custom that men and women were participating in 1767. He also noticed that people of Polynesia had their backside and the back of their thighs marked with black thin lines with different objects and figures. In 1768 Bougainville documented women of Polynesia were tattooing their buttocks and loins with a dark blue ink (“The revival,” 2008). Almost 10 years had passed and Captain Cook was returning from his voyage to the Marquises Islands. He had documented in his journal “they paint symbols on their bodies and
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call them tattows”. Captain Cook also brought back to Europe with him Ma’i, the first Polynesian to travel to Europe. Ma’i was becoming increasingly popular for his tattoos (“The revival,” 2008). The art of tattooing flourished in a society which had no written language. Tattooing also
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Polynesian+Tattooing - Polynesian Tattooing 1 Polynesian...

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