Male%20Anatomy - What’s In a Word What’s In a Word...

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Unformatted text preview: What’s In a Word What’s In a Word Sexual Slang Sexual Slang Penis Vagina Prick. 16th ­17th century; once a term of endearment Schlong. 19th century; Yiddish & German word meaning snake Cock. 15th­18th century standard English Twat. mid­17th century; derived from Old English Twachylle – passage. Pussy. 17th century Cunt. obscenity 1700­ 1960, could not be printed in full. Defined in 1811 as a nasty word for a nasty thing. Intercourse Make love. 16th century; one of the most common euphemisms Bang. 20th century evolved from Knock­ 15th century Fuck. Earliest use in 1503; appeared in dictionaries late 16th century intermittently; 1972 included in Oxford English Dictionary Nail. 20th century Sexuality Sexuality Sexuality refers to the totality of being a person. It includes all of those aspects of the human being that relates specifically to being boy or girl, woman or man and is an entity subject to life­long dynamic change. Sexuality reflects our human character, not solely our genital nature. As a function of the total personality it is concerned with the biological, psychological, sociological, spiritual, and cultural variable of life which, by their effects on personality development and interpersonal relations, can in turn affect social structure SIECUS Sex Information and Education Council of the United States Male Reproductive Anatomy Male Reproductive Anatomy Nancy King, MS, CFLE Certified Sexuality Educator Testicle • • • • Produce testosterone Produce sperm Firm not hard or lumpy Sperm produced 100 million/day • Sperm production affected by Testicle – – – – – Temperature Illness infection Substance use Undescended testicles • Cancer concern for – ages 15-35 Testicle Scrotum Scrotum • Hold testicles • Controls temperature of testicles • Cold, frightened, sexually aroused pull close to body • Warm move away from body Epididymis Testicle Scrotum • Located at the top of the testicle • Contains mature sperm – Sperm production takes 90 days Epididymis • Mature sperm live for 5 to 7 days Vas Deferens Epididymis Testicle Scrotum Vas Deferens • Tube where only sperm travel • Connects epididymis to ejaculator duct • Tube cut for vasectomy Vas Deferens Epididymis Testicle Scrotum Prostate • About size of walnut • Works as gland and muscle • Produces about 30% of semen Prostate – Alkaline substance – Sperm are destroyed by acid • Important function for urination and ejaculatory control • Cancer concern for ages over 50 Ejaculatory Duct Vas Deferens Epididymis Testicle Scrotum Prostate Ejaculatory Duct • Connects vas deferens and bladder to urethra • Men can not urinate and ejaculate at same time – Prevented by sphincters • Retrograde ejaculation – Occasional not problem – Frequently needs to be checked out Ejaculatory Duct Seminal Vesicle Vas Deferens Epididymis Testicle Scrotum Prostate Seminal Vesicles • Produces nearly 70% of semen • Fluid is alkaline and contains fructose Ejaculatory Duct Bladder Seminal Vesicle Vas Deferens Penis Shaft Epididymis Testicle Scrotum Prostate Cowper’s Gland Urethra Urethra • Carries urine from the bladder • Carries semen out during ejaculation • Mucus membranes that can allow bacteria to enter body Ejaculatory Duct Seminal Vesicle Vas Deferens Epididymis Testicle Scrotum Prostate Cowper’s Gland Cowper’s Gland • Produces clear thick fluid • Alkaline fluid • Occurs before ejaculation • Coats urethra protect sperm from acid • Can contain sperm Ejaculatory Duct Bladder Seminal Vesicle Vas Deferens Epididymis Testicle Scrotum Prostate Cowper’s Gland Ejaculatory Duct Bladder Seminal Vesicle Vas Deferens Penis Shaft Epididymis Testicle Scrotum Prostate Cowper’s Gland • Sensitive • Becomes erect with sexual arousal Penis Shaft – Contains spongy bodies – Engorges with blood during sexual arousal – Erections occur every 90min during sleep Ejaculatory Duct Bladder Seminal Vesicle Vas Deferens Penis Shaft Urethra Epididymis Testicle Prostate Cowper’s Gland Glans Scrotum Glans • Most sensitive part of the penis • Males born with foreskin covering glans • Circumcision – removal of foreskin • Circumcision performed for – Religious reasons – Cultural reasons – Ascetic reasons • No medical reason for removal of foreskin • Proper hygiene prevents smegma – Natural bi-product of bacteria, dead cells and oil • Uncircumcised penis does not cause or significantly increase risk of infections – Exception potential increase risk for HIV • Care needed when applying condom to uncircumcised penis Ejaculatory Duct Bladder Seminal Vesicle Rectum Vas Deferens Penis Shaft Epididymis Testicle Scrotum Anus Prostate Cowper’s Gland Glans Urethra Nancy King, MS, CFLE Nancy King, MS, CFLE Certified Sexuality Educator ncking@chartermi.net ...
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