lecture _7 - EarlyVirusReplicationEvents...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Early Virus Replication Events Achison Ch. 4: Virus Entry.  Useful Reading Material: host Cell constraints. Shors: Ch. 3: Viral Replication cycles. cellular processes to express 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
What a Virus Must Do to Survive  Find the right cell and enter the cell.  Uncoat to activate the viral genome.  Translate the viral genes.  Replicate the viral genome.  Assemble new virus particles.  Exit from the cell.  Find a new host to infect. All of the events in virus infection  depend on very complex  interactions between the virus and  its host. Each stage of infection is  highly specific. Every virus must be  able to exploit specific processes of  its host for gene expression and  replication, and must be able to 
Background image of page 2
The hosts that viruses infect are very different and each  presents unique problems that the virus must overcome.  As an example, bacterial cells have complex  sex pili, flagella, proteins lipids and  carbohydrates in the cell wall. But, DNA  phages have found ways to inject their DNA  directly into bacteria .   2) During the pinning stage the fibers   bring the base plate in contact with   the cell. Lysozyme in the base plate   makes a tiny hole in the wall. 3) The sheath contracts and a portion    of the sheath enters the cell.  4) The head plug is released and  phage   DNA is injected directly into  the cell. 1) T7 Phages first attach to the cell at specific  receptors on the wall using fibers at the base  of the phage tail. They then undergo a series  of  positioning steps during the landing  stage.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
RNA Phages Evolved a Different Solution by Infecting Through Sex Pili 1) Phage particles bind efficiently to  host pili. Recognition of the pili  determines the host range. 2) The icosahedral phage particles  consist of 180 protein subunits  plus a single  “A” protein per virus  particle. The A protein functions to  bind virus particles to the bacterial  sex pili. Electron Micrograph of an RNA phage bound to  an F pilus of E. coli. Thousands of virions have  bound to this pilus. 3) During binding, the “A” protein associates with the viral RNA and  releases the RNA from the virus particle. The RNA and the A  protein  penetrate the cell membrane and the RNA enters the cell. 4) Naked RNA can be used to infect spheroplasts whose cell walls have  been removed by enzyme treatments. This demonstrates that the  viral  RNA has all the information needed to infect cells. The host  range can  also be expanded greatly by using this treatment to  Bacterial congugation  involves DNA transfer  through Sex Pili
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 24

lecture _7 - EarlyVirusReplicationEvents...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online