lecture_02_02_10

lecture_02_02_10 - Today Thermodynamic and empirical...

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1 02-2-10 Today Thermodynamic and empirical equilibrium constants Use Q to predicting the direction of change Dependence of equilibria on temperature, pressure, and composition Thursday (02-4-10) More equilibrium calculations Chapter 16 – Acid base Chemistry Announcements Office hour today (room 210) will be at 1-2pm K is called the equilibrium constant – it characterizes the composition of the reaction mixture in the equilibrium state. In equilibrium at a given temperature, at a given pressure, the composition of the reaction mixture is fixed, i.e. all concentrations are constant. Equilibrium Constants
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2 Away from the equilibrium , the composition of the mixture is arbitrary and not fixed. For this case, the composition can be described with the Reaction Quotient Q. As the mixture approaches the equilibrium state, all reactant concentrations get closer to their equilibrium values, and Q becomes K. Q Equilibrium Constants – a closer look Reaction in gas phase: Same reaction in solution K c and K p are called Empirical Equilibrium Constants
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3 c n p K ) RT ( K Δ = K p and K c (Q p and Q c ) have numerically different values for the same reaction. They can be interconverted according to (eq 15.16, from Ideal Gas Law) T: Temperature in K R: Ideal gas constant in L atm K -1 mol -1 Δ n: change in moles of gas, I.e. Δ n=-1 for 2 CO + O 2 2 CO 2 Note: Equation 15.13 in Petrucci is incorrect. It should be:
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This note was uploaded on 02/16/2010 for the course CHEM 35991 taught by Professor Osterloh during the Spring '10 term at UC Davis.

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lecture_02_02_10 - Today Thermodynamic and empirical...

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