Conservation of Energy

Conservation of Energy - Conservation of Energy...

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Conservation of Energy Introduction/Theory The purpose of this experiment is to examine the theory of conservation of energy, which states that the total energy of a system is equal to the sum of the kinetic and potential energies at any given time. Kinetic energy is calculated by taking 1/2mv 2 , which is equal to the total energy mgh when dropping an object through a photogate sensor, allowing us to calculate its velocity by taking the square root of 2gh, where h is the height above the photogate sensor from where the object is released. Free Fall The displacement of an object on the horizontal x-axis has no effect when calculating the potential energy of an object, because in the absence of kinetic energy, the only force acting on the object is gravity. Therefore changing the magnitude of the height only alters the potential energy of an object. Diameter of tube – 2.95 cm Table of velocities Observed Velocities H=10cm H=20cm H=30cm 1.355 1.923 2.492 1.368 1.929 2.516 1.357 1.914 2.507 1.347 1.928 2.490 1.350 1.933 2.489 Theoretical v 1.359 1.928 2.50 Standard Dev. .01717 .00211 .000639 Examining our data will show that our results are very close to the calculated velocities (which were calculated using v=sqrt(2mh) ). Friction is not a factor in this experiment, except for the negligible amount due to air resistance. When dropping a paper tube from
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This note was uploaded on 02/16/2010 for the course PHYSICS V85.001100 taught by Professor Lenihan during the Fall '05 term at NYU.

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Conservation of Energy - Conservation of Energy...

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