Chapter 1

Chapter 1 - Chapter1 Howgrouplife

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Chapter 1 The Sociological Perspective 
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Putting Social Life into Perspective Sociology  is the systematic study of human  society and social interaction Sociologists study societies and social  interactions to develop theories of: How human behavior is shaped by group life How group life is affected by individuals
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Why Study Sociology? Helps us gain a better understanding of ourselves  and our social world Helps us see how behavior is shaped by the  groups to which we belong and our society Promotes understanding and tolerance by helping  us look beyond personal experiences and gain  insight into the larger world order
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Society society  is a large social grouping that  shares the same geographical territory and  is subject to the same political authority  and dominant cultural expectations Examples: United States, Mexico, or Nigeria
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The Sociological Imagination The ability to see the relationship  between  individual experiences  and the larger  society Distinguishes between  personal troubles   and  social issues
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Personal Troubles Personal troubles  are private problems  that affect individuals and the networks of  people with which they associate regularly Example: One person being unemployed or  running up a high credit card debt could be  identified as a personal trouble 
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Public Issues Public issues  are problems that affect  large numbers of people and require  solutions at the societal level  Widespread unemployment and massive,  nationwide consumer debt are examples of  public issues
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Importance of a Global Sociological  Imagination Although existing sociological theory and  research provide a foundation for  sociological thinking, we must develop a  more global approach for the future In the 21st century, we face important  challenges in a rapidly changing nation and  world
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High Income Countries Nations with highly industrialized economies;  technologically advanced industrial,  administrative, and service occupations Examples:  United States, Canada, Australia, New  Zealand, Japan, and Western Europe Have a high standard of living and a lower  death rate due to advances in nutrition and  medical technology
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Middle Income Countries Nations with industrializing economies,  particularly in urban areas, and moderate 
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This note was uploaded on 02/17/2010 for the course ? ? taught by Professor ? during the Spring '10 term at Baylor.

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Chapter 1 - Chapter1 Howgrouplife

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