Chapter 2-1

Chapter 2-1 - Chapter 2 Sociological Research Methods...

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Unformatted text preview: Chapter 2 Sociological Research Methods Chapter Outline Why is Sociological Research Necessary? The Sociological Research Process Research Methods Ethical Issues in Sociological Research Common Sense and Sociological: Suicide Common sense may tell us that people who threaten suicide will not commit suicide Sociological research indicates that people who threaten to kill themselves may attempt suicide Common sense may tell us that suicide is caused by despair or depression Research suggests that suicide is sometimes used as a means of lashing out because of real or imagined wrongs Common Sense and Sociological: Suicide Historically, the commonsense view of suicide was that it was a sin, a crime, and a mental illness Emile Durkheim related suicide to the issue of cohesiveness in society In Suicide , Durkheim documented his contention that a high suicide rate was symptomatic of large-scale societal problems His approach to research still influences researchers Question Within the past 12 months, how many people have you known personally that have committed suicide? GSS National Data Region East Midwest South West None 91.9% 86.6% 90.2% 85.7% 1 or More 8.1% 13.4% 9.8% 14.3% Sociology and Scientific Evidence Sociology involves debunking, unmasking false ideas or opinions Two approaches: Normative Empirical The Normative Approach The normative approach uses religion, customs, habits, traditions, and law to answer important questions It is based on beliefs about what is right and wrong and what ought to be in society The Empirical Approach The empirical approach attempts to answer questions through systematic data collection and analysis This is referred to as scientific method Based on the assumption that knowledge is gained by direct, systematic observation Sociology and Scientific Standards Two basic scientific standards must be met: Scientific beliefs should be supported by good evidence or information These beliefs should be open to public debate and critiques from other scholars, with alternative interpretations being considered Types of Empirical Studies Descriptive studies attempt to describe social reality or provide facts about some group, practice, or event Designed to find out what is happening to whom, where, and when Explanatory studies attempt to explain cause and effect relationships and to provide information on why certain events do or do not occur Theory and Research Cycle A theory is a set of logically interrelated statements that attempts to describe, explain, and...
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This note was uploaded on 02/17/2010 for the course ? ? taught by Professor ? during the Spring '10 term at Baylor.

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Chapter 2-1 - Chapter 2 Sociological Research Methods...

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