Chapter 4

Chapter 4 - Chapter4 Socialization Socialization

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    Chapter 4 Socialization
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Socialization The lifelong process of social interaction  through which individuals acquire a self  identity and the physical, mental, and social  skills needed for survival in society Socialization is the essential link between the  individual and society
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Why Socialization Is Important Teaches us ways to think, talk and act that are  necessary for social living Ensures that members of society are  socialized to support the existing social  structure Allows society to pass culture on to the next  generation
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How Much Do You Know About Early  Socialization and Child Care? True or False? In the United States, full-day child care often  costs as much per year as college tuition at a  public college or university
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How Much Do You Know About Early  Socialization and Child Care? True Full-day child care typically costs between  $4,000 and $10,000 per child per year, which  is as much or more than tuition at many public  colleges and universities
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How Much Do You Know About Early   Socialization and Child Care? True or False? The cost of child care is a major problem for  many U.S. families
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How Much Do You Know About Early   Socialization and Child Care? True Child care outside the home is a major  financial burden, particularly for the one out of  every three families with young children but  with an income of less than $25,000 a year
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Human Development Each of us is a product of two forces:  1. Heredity- “nature”  2. The social environment -“nurture” Biology dictates our physical makeup The social environment largely determines  how we develop and behave
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Freud’s Theory of Personality
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Freud’s Theory of Personality Human development occurs in three states  that reflect different levels of personality: Id Ego Superego
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Erikson and Psychosocial Development: 8  Stages According to Erikson, each stage is accompanied  by a crisis that involves transitions in social  relationships: 1. Trust versus mistrust (birth to age one) 1. Autonomy versus shame and doubt (1 to 3) 1. Initiative versus guilt (3 to 5) 1. Industry versus inferiority (6 to 11)
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Chapter 4 - Chapter4 Socialization Socialization

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