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soci250m7s07 - Max Weber Group 2 Max Weber: Introduction...

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Max Weber Group 2
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Max Weber: Introduction Born April 21, 1864 In Erfurt in Thuringia, Germany (Suburbs of Berlin) Eldest of seven children in upper middle class family German Political Economist and Sociologist One of the founders of modern Sociology Began his interest in Social Sciences when he was 13 Brother Alfred became a Sociologist and Economist Helped found the German Democratic Party
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Max Weber: Education In 1882 Weber enrolled in the University of Heidelberg as a law student In 1884 transferred back home to study at the University of Berlin Studied one term at the University of Goettingen and had short periods of military training In 1886 passed the “Referendar” (similar to the bar association in British and American legal systems) but continued to study history In 1889 earned his law doctorate and two years later was qualified to hold a German professorship
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Max Weber: Post Education After 1889 took an interest in contemporary social policy Joined a professional association of German economists (called the “Verin”) who saw economics solved the many social problems of the age In 1890 the “Verin” established a research program to study influx of foreign farm workers to Eastern Germany as local laborers migrated to Germany’s rapidly industrializing cities. Weber was put in charge of this study and wrote a large part of the results. The final report was acclaimed as an excellent piece of empirical research and boosted Weber’s reputation as an expert in agrarian economics (microeconomics)
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1893-Married Marianne Schnitger, who later became an author and published Weber’s works after his death 1894-Moved to the University of Freiburg, appointed professor of Economics 1896-Moved to the University of Heidelburg 1898- Quarreled with his father, who died two months later, which left Weber more prone to nervousness and insomnia. Reduced his teaching load and spent months in a sanitarium 1900-Moved to Italy for two years Later Life
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Between 1898-1902 Weber didn’t publish a single paper 1903-Resigned from Heidelburg professorship and became an associate editor for Archives for Social Science and Social Welfare 1904-Published The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism , his most famous and influential work. The Protestant Ethic
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During WWI During World War I, Weber joined the worker and soldier council of Heidelburg (1918). Was also consultant to the German Armistice Commission at the Treaty of Versailles, and a member of the committee responsible for drafting the Weimar Constitution - He personally advocated for the inclusion of Article 48 in the Weimar Constitution, which Hitler later used as justification for his dictatorship
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After WWI He resumed teaching after WWI, first at Vienna and later at Munich In Munich he established a sociology institution in the University but didn’t personally participate in it. He was extremely left-wing during this time,
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soci250m7s07 - Max Weber Group 2 Max Weber: Introduction...

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