Lecture 14 - /28/08 Torso of an athlete ca 490-480 B.C...

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Lecture 14 10/28/08 Torso of an athlete ca. 490-480 B.C. Weary Herakles (Roman marble copy) Contrapposto <o > n.( g )o , ( ) Very articulated e (e )muscle expression Polyclitus 5 th c. B.C. brought contrapposto to the highest level. Doryphoros ” (modern copy) Refinement of contrapposto and mobile repose /perfect proportions of the body Subtlety e of the expression increases liveliness e More pronounced musculature e , esthetically appealing Polyclitus wrote Kanon (Rule) which tends to sum up rules for sculptures Again, lowered gaze suggests his mortal identity Greek male sculptures are mostly nude e , while females are sometimes in clothes. It is the celebration of athleticism? Some argue that it reveals ancient Greek sexuality (homosexuality). However, “homosexuality” is a modern term which did not apply to Greek ideas. “Sexuality” in modern sense is often defined in binary
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oppositions . Roman Sculptures (
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This note was uploaded on 02/18/2010 for the course EUR 101 taught by Professor Westphalen during the Spring '08 term at SUNY Stony Brook.

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Lecture 14 - /28/08 Torso of an athlete ca 490-480 B.C...

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