Test review 1- chapters 3-5

Test review 1- chapters 3-5 - Latin master review Test 1...

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Latin master review: Test 1 Austin DeBoer 1. Chapter 3: 2 nd declension: Masculine nouns and Adjectives; apposition; word order a. 2nd declension: i. Follows base+ endings. ii. Masculine or neuter nouns iii. Endings: Singular Plural Nominative -us -i Genitive -i -orum Dative -o -is Accusative -um -os Ablative -o -is Vocative -e -i b. Example in text: Amicus, amici m. Singular Plural Nominative amicus amici Genitive amici amicorum Dative amico amicis Accusative amicum amicos Ablative amico amicis Vocative amice -amici c. -er words i. Some keep the "e" 1. Puer, pueri (m) ii. Some lose the "e"
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Latin master review: Test 1 Austin DeBoer 1. Ager, agri iii. Vir is 2nd declension because the genitive singular tell you which declension it is in 1. Vir, Viri (m) iv. Diffferent dominant vowels between declensions 1. 1 st : A 2. 2 nd 2. Vocative case a. Addressing people i. 1st declension ii. Nominative: puella-->puella b. 2nd declension i. -us--> e 1. Amicus-->Amice ii. Er-same as the nominative iii. Vir--> same as the nominative iv. -ius--> I 1. Filius, filii 3. a. The agree in case, number, and gender English Latin Oh great friends O magne amice Oh Great field O magne ages Oh great son O magne filii 4. 1st declention adjective and noun agreement a. Great Sailor Singular Plural Nominative Nauta Magnus Nauta Magni Genitive Nautae magni Nautarum magnorum Dative Nautae magno Nautis magnis Accusative Nautam magnum Nautas magnos Ablative Nauta magno Nautis magnis Vocative Nauta magne nautaemagni 5. Apposition a. A noun that describes another noun, usually separated by commas b. Example: below are different instances when My son can be in apposition to gaius, giving us moer information about the simple subject “son” and vice-vera. English Latin o I see Gaius, my son, in the field Gaium, meam filium in agro video Gaius, my son, sees me Gaius, meus filius me videt I'm giving a field to Gaius my son Gaio, meo filio , agrum I guard the field without gaius, my son Sine Gaio, meo, filion agrum I see my son, Gaius, in the Field Meam fillium, Gaium, in agro video 6. Comments on case endings: a. 2 nd declension endings are the same as the first ( dative and ablative plural) and others are similar.
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Latin master review: Test 1 Austin DeBoer b. Only in the singular of “-us” nouns and adjective of the second declension does the vocative ever differ in spelling from the nominative singular: amicus, amice. 7. Word Order: a. Goes in this order i. Subject and its modifiers ii. The indirect object iii. The direct object iv. Adverbial words/ phrases v. The verb Chapter 3: Self-tutorial questions: 1. Name the case, number, and syntactical usage indicated by each of the following endings of masculines of the 2 nd declension: Latin Case Number Syntactical usage -um Accusative Singular Indirect object -I (pl) Nominative Plural Subject --us Nominative Singular Subject -os Accusative Plural Indirect object -e Vocative Singular Direct address 2. Name the case(s) and number of the following endings, and name the English preposition which
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Test review 1- chapters 3-5 - Latin master review Test 1...

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