Test review 1- chapters 6-7

Test review 1- chapters 6-7 - Latin Master Review: Test 1...

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Latin Master Review: Test 1 Austin DeBoer 1. Chapter 6: Sum: future and imperfect indicative; Possum: present, future, and imperfect indicative; Complementary infinitive. a. Future and imperfect indicative of sum: i. Here are the terms for the irregular term sum, esse, in the imperfect and Future tenses.: ii. Sum, esse, fui, futurm- to be Singular Plural Imperfect: First Eram, I was Eramus, we were Second Eras, you were Eratis, you (all) were Third Erat, he ( she or it) was Erant, they were Future First Ero, I will be Erimus, we will be Second Eris, you will be Eritis, you (all) will be Third Erit, He (she or it) will be Erunt, they will be b. Irregular Possum, posse, potui: to be able, can, could i. This very common verb is simply a compound of pot- from the irregular adjective, potis (able), and sum. Singular Plural Present First Possum possumus Second Potes potstis Third potest possunt Imperfect First poteram poteramus Second poteras poteratis Third poterat poterant Future
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Latin Master Review: Test 1 Austin DeBoer First potero poterimus Second poteris poteritis Third poterit poterunt c. Complementary infinitives: i. An infinitive that goes along with verbs like possum, who need an infinitive to complete their meaning. ii. Has no separate subject, its subject is that of verb on which it depends 2. Chapter 6: self- tutorial exercises: 1) What connection can be traced between the spelling of complementary in the term “complementary infinitive” and the syntactical principle. This infinitive completes a verb to give it its’ full meaning, such a possum, syntactically this “completes” the verb phrase allowing it to make sense. Such as “possum amo; I am able to love” 2) In the verb sum and its compounds what do the following personal endings mean: Latin compound of sum English translation -mus We -nt They -s You( sg) -t He, she, it -o I -nt They -tis You(all)n 3) If the verb possum is composed of pot+sum, where amoung the various forms is the t changed to s and where does it remain unchanged? In forms where there, if following the standard “ pot+sum” idea would give you a t and an s next to eachother, they are suimply changed to be a double “s.” forms like I am able is possum, not potsum. 4) Translate the following random forms:
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Latin Master Review: Test 1 Austin DeBoer Latin Translation
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Latin Master Review: Test 1 Austin DeBoer Erat He was Poterat He was able Erit He will Poterit He will be able to Sumus We are Possumus We are able Poteramus We were able to Poterimus We will be able to Poteram I was able to Eram I was Ero I will be Potero I will be Erunt They will be Poterunt They will be able to Poterant They were able to Esse To be posse To be able 5) Translate into latin:
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Test review 1- chapters 6-7 - Latin Master Review: Test 1...

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