Common Writing Errors in Fiction

Common Writing - Common Writing Errors in Fiction When you proofread keep this next to you What to do with two whole sentences 1 Have two separate

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Common Writing Errors in Fiction When you proofread, keep this next to you. What to do with two whole sentences 1. Have two separate sentences. I was eating my zucchini with great zeal. I don't know why. No one cares about me. I'm moving out. She's dated lots of athletes. Why not date one more? 2. Use a semi-colon. I was eating my zucchini with great zeal; I don't know why. No one cares about me; I'm moving out. She's dated lots of athletes; why not date one more? 3. Use a comma and a coordinating conjunction (for, and, not, but, or, yet, so) I was eating my zucchini with great zeal, but I don't know why. No one cares about me, and I'm moving out. She's dated lots of athletes, so why not date one more? You cannot just have a comma: I was eating my zucchini with great zeal, I don't know why. No one cares about me, I'm moving out. She's dated lots of athletes, why not date one more? If you want emphasis Use italics. Do not underline, do not bold, do not capitalize, and do not elongate words. NO: "I don't wannnnnnt to," I said. That soup is waaaaaayyyy too hot. I can go to the store if I HAVE to. Look at that face , man. YES: "I don't want to," I said. That soup is way too hot. I can go to the store if I have to. Look at that face , man. How to do dialogue 1. For every new speaker, start a new paragraph. Use quotation marks to surround quotes. 2. Keep speech tags short. You may not need them if it's clear who is talking. NO: "It's cool with me," Liz said as she opened the cabinet drawer, which held all the spoons in the house. YES: "It's cool with me," Liz said. She opened the cabinet drawer, which held all the spoons in the house. ALSO FINE: "It's cool with me," Liz said, opening a drawer.
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3. Most of the time, punctuation goes within the quotation marks. Unless it's not part of the quote. "Thomas Jefferson was a fool," I said. Philip said, "What do you think of that?" Mark said, "I love ponies." Did you hear him say, "I love ponies"? Colons and semicolons go outside.
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This note was uploaded on 02/19/2010 for the course QW crw1123 taught by Professor Bobsanchez during the Spring '10 term at University of Kelaniya.

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Common Writing - Common Writing Errors in Fiction When you proofread keep this next to you What to do with two whole sentences 1 Have two separate

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