syllabus - MATH/CS 240(Intro Discrete Math SYLLABUS Fall...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: MATH/CS 240 (Intro. Discrete Math.) SYLLABUS, Fall 2009 Lecture: TR 11PM – 12:15 PM, Grainger 2080 Prof. Jordan Ellenberg Text is: Office: 323 Van Vleck Hall Discrete Math. & its Applications 6th ed., by K. Rosen Email: [email protected] http://www.math.wisc.edu/˜ellenber Office Hours (JSE): Tues, 1:30-2:30 PM, VV 323 TAs: Hao Lin, l [email protected], Baris Aydinlioglu b [email protected] Course Content Mathematics can be loosely divided into two parts. The first is continuous mathematics; as the name suggests, this part of math treats phenomena that can be moved continuously, like functions, curves, and geometric spaces. Most of the math you’ve learned so far – geometry, trigonometry, calculus – is continuous in nature. The basic object of continuous mathematics is the real number line. Because the physical universe (at least to the naked eye) is continuous, this is the part of mathematics most associated with physics. The second part is discrete mathematics, the subject of our course. Here we throw aside any notion of continuous variation. The basic objects of discrete mathematics are the set of integers and of logical values; there is no way to move continuously from 2 to 3, or from ”true” to ”false.” Because the states of a computer are discrete, this is the part of mathematics most associated with computer science. Math/CS 240 covers the fundamentals of discrete mathematics. It is a requirement for the BS degree programs in Computer Engineering offered by the ECE Department and in Computer Science offered by the CS Department. It is now a prerequisite for (getting into) advanced computer science courses (CS 367, 520 and 577). The course is a foundational math course for this program and is meant to be taken early in the program; it is also a good foundation for higher mathematics courses. We will aim for breadth, not depth; yougood foundation for higher mathematics courses....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 02/19/2010 for the course CL 201 taught by Professor Fairguy during the Fall '09 term at University of Wisconsin.

Page1 / 3

syllabus - MATH/CS 240(Intro Discrete Math SYLLABUS Fall...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online