Rough Draft Final 2.docx - Hdz-Nietling1 Aleksei Hernandez-Nietling Dr McNally Writing 2211 Word Count 1,940 10 November 2019 NCAA Division 1 Athletes

Rough Draft Final 2.docx - Hdz-Nietling1 Aleksei...

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Hdz-Nietling1 Aleksei Hernandez-Nietling Dr. McNally Writing 2211 Word Count: 1,940 10 November 2019 NCAA Division 1 Athletes: Overworked and Underpaid Imagine an undergraduate student working over 60 hours a week. They’re unable to use their name, background, experience, and talent to receive monetary compensation for their work while a powerful, money-hungry "non-profit organization" profits off of them. It’s a startling scenario but that is the reality for the vast majority of NCAA ( National Collegiate Athletic Association) Division 1 student-athletes in the United States. Indeed, NCAA student-athletes are not professional athletes and they should not be given million-dollar contracts. However, they should be allowed to make a YouTube video or make a t-shirt with their face on it and be able to profit from it. However, it is illegal for them to do so because of NCAA amateurism rules and bylaws such as the amateurism certification and NCAA eligibility center . This same non-profit organization makes over 1 billion dollars annually from college athletics alone. What are the NCAA amateurism rules, Amateurism Certification, and Eligibility Center? In 1906, the NCAA was founded to protect young people from dangerous and exploitative athletic practices. In the early 1940s, the NCAA passed a law that included an amateurism clause aimed to avoid workman's compensation claims from injuries connected to football players. Since then, more specific and limiting laws have come up including the amateurism bylaw 12.5.1.1(h) along with the emergence of the Amateurism Certification and the NCAA Eligibility Center all of which impose limitations on the student-athlete in regards to his/her eligibility
Hdz-Nietling2 status. According to the official NCAA Division 1 manual effective fall of 2019, the Bylaw 12.5.1.1(h) states, "Any commercial items with names, likenesses or pictures of multiple student- athletes may be sold only at the member institution at which the student-athletes are enrolled, the institution's conference, institutionally controlled...outlets or outlets controlled by the charitable, educational or nonprofit organization...Items that include an individual student-athlete's name, picture or likeness (e.g., name on jersey, name or likeness on a bobble-head doll), other than informational items...may not be sold” (82 NCAA). According to the Next College Student Athlete , the amateurism certification is something any student-athlete must obtain " To be eligible to compete and receive a scholarship as an NCAA athlete…(while) meet(ing) the definition of an amateur athlete...”. According to Peterson’s , an educational services company, an amateur athlete is defined as "someone who competes in sports for personal satisfaction and not for monetary gain.'' The amateurism certification is directly linked to the NCAA Eligibility Center. The National Scholastic Athletics Association states that “The NCAA Eligibility Center was created to bring academic and amateurism certifications together under one roof. Its purpose is to ensure

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