Biomechanicss

Biomechanicss - Industrial Ergonomics Biomechanics 2-D...

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ISE – 3624 Industrial Ergonomics M. Agnew, 2010 Industrial Ergonomics Biomechanics 2-D Biomechanical Models 2-D Spine Models 3-D Biomechanical Models
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ISE – 3624 Industrial Ergonomics M. Agnew, 2010 Okay… Time for Biomechanics
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ISE – 3624 Industrial Ergonomics M. Agnew, 2010 Definitions Biomechanics — uses the laws of physics and engineering mechanics to describe the motions of various body segments (kinematics) and understand the effects of forces and moments acting on the body (kinetics) Occupational Biomechanics — sub-discipline of biomechanics which studies the physical interaction of workers with their tools, machines, and materials so as to enhance the workers performance while minimizing risk of musculoskeletal injury
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ISE – 3624 Industrial Ergonomics M. Agnew, 2010 Biomechanics Combines: Physics Statics Anthropometry Medicine using mathematical relationships
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ISE – 3624 Industrial Ergonomics M. Agnew, 2010 Motivations ~1/3 of U.S. workers perform tasks that require high strength demands Large variations in population capacity (strength) Basis for understanding and preventing overexertion injuries Provides technology to evaluate task factors and simulate design alternatives Wide application potential Orthopaedics Rehabilitation Sports science
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ISE – 3624 Industrial Ergonomics M. Agnew, 2010 Guiding Principle Maintain: D < C D: task demands (forces and moments) C: human capability (strength, tissue tolerance) Both values are highly variable and difficult to measure and predict “Strength” is not one thing In this context we typically use maximum joint moment Function of posture, time, etc.
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ISE – 3624 Industrial Ergonomics M. Agnew, 2010 Biomechanical Models 2D Static 3D Dynamic 3D Static 2D Dynamic
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ISE – 3624 Industrial Ergonomics M. Agnew, 2010 Physics Review Force — interaction between two objects Force = mass * acceleration (F=ma) Moment—tendency of a force to rotate an object Moment = Force * Distance (moment arm) M = I α ( I=moment of inertia, α = angular acceleration) moment arm
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ISE – 3624 Industrial Ergonomics M. Agnew, 2010 Static Equilibrium Conditions for an object to remain at rest (or
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Biomechanicss - Industrial Ergonomics Biomechanics 2-D...

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