Chapter 2 Solutions

Chapter 2 Solutions - 2.1-3, 47-49, 51, Gd. 59-612.1 Can...

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Unformatted text preview: 2.1-3, 47-49, 51, Gd. 59-612.1 Can you calculate the percent elongation of materials based only on the information given in Fig. 2.6? Explain.Recall that the percent elongation is defined by Eq. (2.6) on p. 33 and depends on the original gage length (lo) of the specimen. From Fig. 2.6 on p. 37 only the necking strain (true and engineering)and true fracture strain can be determined. Thus, we cannot calculate the percent elongation of the specimen; also, note that the elongation is a function of gage length and increases with gage length.2.2 Explain if it is possible for the curves in Fig. 2.4 to reach 0% elongation as the gage length is increased further.The percent elongation of the specimen is a function of the initial and final gage lengths. When the specimen is being pulled, regardless of the original gage length, it will elongate uniformly (and permanently) until necking begins. Therefore, the specimen will always have a certain finite elongation. However, note that as the specimens gage length is increased, the contribution of localized elongation (that is, necking) will decrease, but the total elongation will not approach zero.2.3 Explain why the difference between engineering strain and true strain becomes larger as strain increases. Is this phenomenon true for both tensile and compressive strains? Explain....
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This note was uploaded on 02/20/2010 for the course ISE 2204 taught by Professor Rhsturges during the Spring '08 term at Virginia Tech.

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Chapter 2 Solutions - 2.1-3, 47-49, 51, Gd. 59-612.1 Can...

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