Lecture 12a - Turning

Lecture 12a - Turning - Machining Machining Turning Lecture...

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Machining Machining – Turning Turning Lecture 12.a ISE 2204 – Introduction to Manufacturing Processes Dr. Jaime Camelio April 14 th , 2009 Cutting Tools Surface Finish Turning Fundamentals Depth of Cut and Speed Selection Cutting Tools Type of Turning Operations ISE 2204 – Introduction to Manufacturing Processes – Spring 2009 Topics to be discussed
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ISE 2204 – Introduction to Manufacturing Processes – Spring 2009 Characteristics of Machining Surfaces produced on steel in machining, as observed with a scanning electron microscope: (a) turned surface, and (b) surface produced by shaping. Source: J.T. Black and S. Ramalingam. Schematic illustration o a dul too in orthogona ISE 2204 – Introduction to Manufacturing Processes – Spring 2009 Surfaces in Machining Schematic illustration of a dull tool in orthogonal cutting (exaggerated). Note that at small depths of cut, the rake angle can effectively become negative. In such cases, the tool may simply ride over the workpiece surface, burnishing it, instead of cutting.
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ISE 2204 – Introduction to Manufacturing Processes – Spring 2009 Surface Finish Range of surface roughness obtained in various machining processes. Note the wide range within each group, especially in turning and boring. ISE 2204 – Introduction to Manufacturing Processes – Spring 2009 Terminology in Turning Terminology used in a turning operation on a lathe, where f is the feed (in mm/rev or in./rev) and d is the depth of cut. Note that feed in turning is equivalent to the depth of cut in orthogonal cutting (see Fig. 8.2), and the depth of cut in turning is equivalent to the width of cut in orthogonal cutting.
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ISE 2204 – Introduction to Manufacturing Processes – Spring 2009 Lathe Operations Variety of machining operations that can be performed on a lathe. (a) Schematic illustration of a turning operation, showing depth of cut, d ,andfeed , f . Cutting speed is the surface speed of the workpiece at the tool tip. (b) Forces acting on a cutting tool in ISE 2204 – Introduction to Manufacturing Processes – Spring 2009 Turning Operations turning. F c isthecutting force; F t isthethrust or feed force (inthe direction of feed);and F r is the radial force that tends to push the tool away from the workpiece being machined. Compare this figure with Fig. 8.11 for a two-dimensional cutting operation.
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Designations and symbols for a right-hand cutting tool. The designation “right hand” means that the tool travels from right to left. General recommendations for tool angles in turning. ISE 2204 – Introduction to Manufacturing Processes – Spring 2009 Tool Angles ISE 2204 – Introduction to Manufacturing Processes – Spring 2009 Lathe General view of a typical lathe, showing various major components. Source: Courtesy of Heidenreich & Harbeck.
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ISE 2204 – Introduction to Manufacturing Processes – Spring 2009 CNC Lathe (a) A computer-numerical-control lathe, with two turrets; these machines have higher power and spindle speed than other lathes in order to take advantage of
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Lecture 12a - Turning - Machining Machining Turning Lecture...

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