4 Reproduction_2009

4 Reproduction_2009 - Reproduction Female anatomy Male...

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Reproduction Female anatomy Male anatomy Female endocrinology Reproductive cycles Male endocrinology
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Management systems for most animals are based upon the female reproductive cycle.
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Estrus Birth Weaning Gestation Lactation Rebreeding
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Management systems for most animals are based upon the female reproductive cycle. The primary function of males is to provide spermatozoa for breeding.
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Female Anatomy Ovary Oviduct Uterus Cervix Vagina Vulva
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Ovary Contains thousands of growing follicles Each follicle contains an ovum or “egg” Receives a rich supply of both blood vessels and nerves
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Ovary
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Ovary
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Sow Ovary
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Follicles grow in response to hormones called gonadotropins either die (become atretic) or ovulate and release their egg.
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Corpus Luteum (Corpora Lutea) form from the tissue that remains after a follicle has ovulated produce a number of hormones associated with pregnancy progesterone is its (their) primary product
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Corpus Albicans (Corpora Albicantia) scar tissue left behind after corpus luteum dies or regresses avascular, non-functional tissue
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Follicle death or Atresia Follicle Maturation
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Ovulation Follicle death or Atresia Follicle Maturation
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Ovulation Follicle death or Atresia Follicle Maturation Luteal Formation & Function
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Ovulation Follicle death or Atresia Follicle Maturation Luteal Regression Luteal Formation & Function
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Sow Ovary CL Follicle CA
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Ovary CL
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Schematic Diagram of Ova Production Stored / Resting pool Developing pool Ovary Ovary Oviduct
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Schematic Diagram of Ova Production Most females have all the ova they will use as adults at birth or shortly after. Developing pool Stored / Resting pool
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Schematic Diagram of Ova Production Follicles are stimulated to leave the stored / resting pool about every 3 to 4 days in most females. These are not replaced. Developing pool Stored / Resting pool
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Schematic Diagram of Ova Production Follicles and ova continue to mature while new ones leave resting pool. Developing pool Stored / Resting pool
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Schematic Diagram of Ova Production Mature follicles either die (become atretic) or ovulate and release their ova. Developing pool Stored / Resting pool
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Oviduct Funnel shaped organ Specialized end near ovary called the fimbria Fimbria picks up ovulated eggs
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Oviduct (cont.) Anterior end called ampulla Posterior end called isthmus Fertilization and early embryonic development takes place in the oviduct in most animals
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Ovary Oviduct
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Oviduct Tip of Uterine Horn
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4 Reproduction_2009 - Reproduction Female anatomy Male...

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