5 Digestion_2009

5 Digestion_2009 - Digestive Physiology and Absorption...

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Digestive Physiology and Absorption Classification of Animals General Overview
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Digestive Physiology and Absorption Classification of Animals General Overview Species Differences - Monogastric omnivores (Poultry versus pigs) - Monogastric herbivores - Ruminants
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Classification of Animals Two ways for classification Digestive anatomy / physiology Normal food preference
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Digestive Anatomy / Physiology Monogastrics - stomach has one compartment - humans, pigs, rabbits, horses, birds Ruminants - stomach has four compartments - cattle, sheep, goats, deer
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Normal Food Preference Carnivore - primarily consumes meat (flesh) Omnivore - normally consumes both meat and plants Herbivore - primarily consumes plants
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Classification of Animals Dual classification scheme dogs - monogastric carnivores pigs - mongastric omnivores horses - monogastric herbivores cattle - ruminant herbivores (Could there be ruminant omnivores or carnivores?)
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Schematic Diagram of Animal Classification Herbivores Mammals Poultry Carnivore Omnivore Herbivore Ruminants Monogastrics
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Plants used for Food by Animals Cereals – usually the seed portion of plants ( seed portion = grain ). Corn, oats, wheat, barley, rice, milo, rye, etc. Usually high energy (due to oil content in the grain) with low fiber and no cellulose
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Plants used for Food by Animals Roughages or Forages – usually the leaves and/or stems of the plant Grass in pastures, hays, silages, many by-products of the milling process Usually low energy / high fiber and contain cellulose and /or lignin
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Digestion is the process by which feed particles are reduced to molecules so that they can enter the body (absorption).
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Digestion includes mechanical action (chewing and gut motility); chemical action (acidic breakdown of food); and enzymatic action (biological cleavage of food).
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Absorption is the processes by which molecules are transported from the digestive tract, through intestinal cells; and enter the vascular or lymph systems.
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5 Digestion_2009 - Digestive Physiology and Absorption...

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