Sheep_Goat_Lab_2009

Sheep_Goat_Lab_2009 - ANS 151 - Introduction to Animal...

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ANS 151 - Introduction to Animal Science Laboratory In the laboratory, we will be exposed to various aspects of sheep and goat management. Sheep and goats are primarily raised on small farm flocks in the southeastern and midwestern U.S. and under range conditions in the far west and portions of the southwestern U.S. Both are important sources of food and fiber production. After the sheep and goat management laboratory, you should be able to: a) discuss and demonstrate the correct procedure for administering medications; b) identify common equipment and describe their uses; c) understand the correct procedures for "throwing" sheep and goats; d) understand the correct procedures for trimming feet; and e) be able to estimate the age of sheep by observation of their teeth. In addition, there is some supplemental information included as part of this laboratory handout that discusses various aspects of swine management. Based on this information you should be able to: f) identify the major anatomical parts of a sheep; g) be able to identify the following breeds of sheep - Cheviot, Dorset, Hampshire, Medium-Wool Merino, Southdown, and Suffolk ( www.ansi.okstate.edu/breeds/ ) ; h) be able to identify the following breeds of goats – Boer, Anglo-Nubian, Pygmy and Alpine. Overview of Daily Activities on Sheep and Goat Operations Most sheep and goat operations operate on a group production system. This type of production system is sometimes called a seasonal production system. In essence, all the animals in a flock or herd are managed in such a way that they are in the same stage or phase of the production cycle. For example, for most sheep/goat operations in N.C., it is desirable to have all the ewes/does bred within a short period of time. Consequently, they should all lamb/kid within the same general time period and any offspring sold as market animals would be sold over a relatively short span of time. This is evident in that terminology such as “lambing/kidding season”, “breeding season” , etc. are often used. Consequently, there are periods of time during the calendar year that no breeding or lambing/kidding would be taking place. In addition, there are also periods in which no lambs/kids are being fed or grown for market. As a result, the daily work of the employees that work on sheep/goat operations primarily is dictated by the current season or phase of the production cycle. During lambing/kidding the workload can be heavy, while during the middle portion of gestation, there isn’t much animal work to be done.
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Throwing Sheep and Checking their Age by Examination of their Teeth When individual sheep need to be restrained for management purposes such as shearing
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Sheep_Goat_Lab_2009 - ANS 151 - Introduction to Animal...

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