Expository Essay Guideline

Expository Essay Guideline - Expository Essay Assignment...

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Unformatted text preview: Expository Essay Assignment 
 
 When
your
group
is
presenting
and
leading
class
discussion,
each
student
in
that
group
 will
write
and
turn
in,
via
the
SPARK
course
website,
an
“expository
essay”
of
 approximately
1,000
words,
drawing
the
primary
readings
and
a
minimum
of
three
 secondary
credible
sources.
 
 Your
essay
should
include
an
annotated
bibliography,
using
MLA
Style
with
in‐text
 citations.
Essays
will
be
submitted
as
one
Word
document
(do
not
have
your
bibliography
 be
a
separate
document,
please)
via
SPARK
prior
to
class
on
the
due
date
(and
bring
one
 copy
to
class
for
your
use).

 
 Be
sure
to
include
your
essay’s
word
count
immediately
under
your
name,
the
due
 date,
and
a
title
of
your
essay.
You
must
use
MLA
Style,
including
a
bibliography
and
 in‐text
parenthetical
citations
for
all
of
your
work
for
this
course,
including
 expository
essays.
You
will
use
in‐text
citations
and
bibliography
for
all
references
 to
specific
scenes,
as
well
as
all
summaries,
paraphrases,
and
quotations
from
both
 primary
and
secondary
sources.


 
 Remember,
you
are
required
to
purchase
the
MLA
(Modern
Language
Association)
 HANDBOOK
FOR
WRITERS
OF
RESEARCH
PAPERS
(sixth
or
seventh
edition)
for
this
 course.
In
it
you
will
find
the
correct
format
for
research
papers,
documentation
guidelines
 for
paper,
media,
and
Internet
sources,
as
well
as
in‐text
citation
style.

Be
sure
to
note
 punctuation
relating
to
quotations
and
parentheses
 
 
 
 
 Expository
Essays
 
 
 Expository
essays
interpret
and
inform.
When
you
write
your
expository
essays,
you
will
be
 doing
both:
interpreting
the
readings,
while
drawing
on
outside
sources
to
assist
us
as
a
class
 in
understanding
major
issues
raised
by
those
readings.
 
 What
are
some
strategies
for
writing
a
strong
expository
essay?
 The
process
of
writing
an
expository
essay
typically
involves
a
number
of
steps.
 These
should
include
the
following:
 • Deciding
on
a
relatively
focused
topic,
problem,
or
question.
 • Searching
for
relevant
and
relatively
current
literature
(books,
journal
articles,
 organizational
websites
–
the
mix
of
these
depends
on
your
topic).
The
more
you
 research
and
read,
the
more
you
become
aware
of
names
that
are
mentioned
 repeatedly
as
influential
authorities.

 Reading
the
materials
you
have
found
and
noting
how
they
approach
your
topic
 or
question:
It
isn’t
necessary
to
read
every
word
of
a
book
to
learn
what
an
 author
says
about
a
particular
subject.
Peruse
the
index.
Skim
through
the
book
 or
article.
A
quick
read
through
the
introduction
or
the
conclusion
gives
the
gist
 of
the
book’s
or
article’s
general
points,
or
argument.
Begin
with
the
most
recent
 studies
and
work
backwards.
A
recent
article’s
list
of
references
or
bibliography
 might
provide
you
with
valuable
works
to
consult.

 Prepare
a
working
outline
for
your
essay
as
you
read,
grouping
notes
from
your
 references
in
the
appropriate
sections
of
your
outline.
Type
up
annotations
 (summaries,
paraphrases,
and
quotations)
and
bibliographic
citations
as
you
 read
to
save
time
later.

 Take
good
notes:
Don’t
trust
your
memory.
Record
all
research.
Write
out
the
 complete
bibliographic
citation
for
each
work.
Record
the
page
number
too,
 because
you’ll
need
it
for
your
in‐text
citations.
(Unless
you
are
citing
an
entire
 book
or
journal
article,
the
in‐text
citation
must
include
a
page
number
or
it’s
 considered
incomplete/inaccurate.)
Write
direct
quotations
word
for
word.
Use
 quotation
marks,
so
it
can
be
recognized
as
a
direct
quote.
Avoid
using
too
many
 direct
quotations.
Take
down
the
substance
of
the
author’s
ideas
in
your
own
 words
(summarizing
and
paraphrasing).
IMPORTANT:
Most
of
the
essay
should
 be
primarily
in
your
own
words
with
appropriate
documentation
of
other’s
ideas
 (all
those
summaries
and
paraphrases
must
have
in‐text
citations
with
page
 numbers).
Don’t
take
too
many
notes
from
a
single
source.
Use
a
wide
range
of
 sources
to
enrich
perspective.

 Evaluating
the
information:
Keep
an
open
mind
and
look
at
a
topic
from
different
 vantage
points.
Determine
the
objectivity
of
the
source
material.
Who
funded
the
 research
studies?
Who
actually
performed
the
research?
For
a
contentious
topic,
 present
as
equally
as
possible
varying
positions
(there
are
seldom
only
two
 • • • • sides,
as
the
media
mistakenly
seems
to
believe).
Be
objective.
Don’t
 overemphasize
one
side.

 • Writing
and
revising
the
narrative:
Keep
your
audience
in
mind
as
your
write.
 Keep
your
paragraphs
short
and
use
subheadings
to
clarify
the
structure.
 Subheadings
break
the
material
into
readable
units.
Identify
areas
of
 controversy
in
the
literature
you
find
on
your
subject
of
interest
and
formulate
 questions
for
the
class
that
need
further
research.

 
 Some
traps
to
avoid:
 • Trying
to
read
everything!
As
you
might
already
have
discovered,
if
you
try
to
 be
exhaustive
you
will
never
be
able
to
finish
the
reading!
The
essay
does
not
 have
to
be
exhaustive;
the
objective
is
not
to
list
as
many
books,
articles,
and
 reports
as
possible.
The
idea
of
the
well
researched
essay
is
not
to
provide
a
 summary
of
all
the
published
work
that
relates
to
your
research,
but
a
survey
of
 the
most relevant and significant
work.

 • Reading
but
not
writing!
It’s
easier
to
read
than
to
write:
given
the
choice,
most
 of
us
would
rather
sit
down
with
a
cup
of
coffee
and
read
yet
another
article
 instead
of
putting
ourselves
in
front
of
the
computer
to
write
about
what
we
 have
already
read!
Writing
takes
much
more
effort,
doesn’t
it?
However,
writing
 can
help
you
to
understand
and
find
relationships
between
the
works
you’ve
 read,
so
don’t
put
writing
off
until
you’ve
“finished”
reading
‐
after
all,
you
will
 probably
still
be
doing
some
reading
all
the
way
through
to
the
end
of
your
 research
project.
Also,
don’t
think
of
what
you
first
write
as
being
the
final
or
 near‐final
version.
Writing
is
a
way
of
thinking,
so
allow
yourself
to
write
as
 many
drafts
as
you
need,
changing
your
ideas
and
information
as
you
learn
more
 about
the
context
of
your
research
problem.
 • On
NOT
keeping
bibliographic
information
as
you
read!
The
moment
will
 come
when
you
have
to
write
your
bibliography
.
.
.
and
then
you
will
realize
you
 have
forgotten
to
keep
the
information
you
need,
and
that
you
never
got
around
 to
putting
references
into
your
work.
The
only
solution
is
to
spend
a
lot
of
time
 in
the
library
tracking
down
all
those
sources
that
you
read
and
going
through
 your
writing
to
find
which
information
came
from
which
source.
To
avoid
this
 nightmare,
always
keep
this
information
in
your
notes.
Always
put
references
 into
your
writing.
Do
this
and
you
will
never
be
called
up
for
plagiarism!
 

 
 
 ...
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This note was uploaded on 02/20/2010 for the course ENGINEERIN 242 211 taught by Professor Tessier during the Spring '10 term at UMass (Amherst).

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