FinalProject - FINAL
PROJECT
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Unformatted text preview: FINAL
PROJECT
 ACTON
RESEARCH
&
PLAN
 Prof.
Connie
Griffin
 
 
 
PROJECT
OVERVIEW
AND
GUIDELINES
 
 Your
Final
Project
is
broken
down
into
sequential
stages
and
includes:
 
 
 I.
A
Research
Proposal
(
3
­
5
pages),
to
include:
 
 
 1)
An
introductory
paragraph
that
concludes
with
a
well‐defined
 statement
of
a
problem,
topic,
or
major
research
question
that
interests
 you
and
can
be
explored
in
the
time
allotted;
 
 
 2)
A
minimum
of
three
supporting
research
questions
that
will
help
 you
contextualize
and
develop
your
topic;
 
 
 3)
An
Annotated
Bibliography
that
includes
at
least
three
scholarly
 sources
(at
least
two
must
be
from
the
Du
Bois
online
research
 databases).
These
will
be
central
to
the
exploration
of
your
research
topic
 (presented
in
MLA
Style).
See
Annotated
Bibliography
Guidelines
on
SPARK.
 Google
and
Wikipedia
are
not
acceptable
sources
for
an
honors‐level
research
 project.

 
 
 
 II.

An
Annotated
Bibliography
of
six
to
nine
sources
 (drawing
on
three
or
more
different
kinds
of
sources).

 
 NOTE:
Your
ANNOTATED
BIBLIOGRAPHY,
which
will
be
included
with
 your
written
Literature
Review,
must
include
a
minimum
of
six
sources,
 with
no
fewer
than
three
different
Du
Bois
Library
Online
Databases,
and
 no
fewer
than
three
of
the
following
(differing)
sources.
For
example,
you
 cannot
use
five
journals,
but
must
draw
on
a
range
of
different
kinds
of
 sources.
At
least
ONE
of
these
sources
must
be
visual
and
may
be
a
chart,
 graph,
video,
image,
and/or
a
useful
and
informative
Website
that
you
use
in
 your
presentation.

 
 2
 • • • • • • • • • 
 a
scholarly
journal;
 a
visual,
which
may
be
a
chart,
graph,
video,
informational
image
or
Website
 (required)
 an
organizational
Web
site:
NOTE:
If
you
draw
on
a
website
with
a
point
of
 view,
be
sure
to
draw
on
other
websites
with
alternative
points
of
view;
 a
recently
published
book
on
University
library
shelves;
 a
government
document;
 an
interview
conducted
by
the
student
with
a
faculty,
graduate
student,
or
 professional
in
the
field;
 attendance
at
an
informative
meeting
on
your
topic;

 credible
news
sources
such
as
PBS,
NPR;
 service
work
in
which
you
are
or
have
engaged.
 
 NOTE:
WIKIPEDIA
is
not
a
credible
source
for
academic
exploration.
It
will
 NOT
be
accepted
as
a
research
source.
Also,
general
encyclopedias
are
 typically
used
as
sources
for
papers
in
high
school,
but
not
in
college.
DO
 NOT
USE
GOOGLE.
Rely
primarily
on
scholarly
databases.
See
Du
Bois
 library’s
online
research
databases
and
subject
guides.

 
 
 
 III.

A
Literature
Review,
which
discusses
your
Research
Process
 and
Findings
(approximately
1500
words­­about
5
pages)
 
 • A Literature Review evaluates, synthesizes, and analyzes research process, methodology, inter-disciplinary areas of focus (at least two), major sources, and findings. See guidelines and requirements on SPARK for the Literature Review.
 
 • Your Literature Review must include the Annotated Bibliography (using template provided on SPARK), applying Modern Language Association (MLA) style, including in-text parenthetical citations. Be sure to review how punctuation works in bibliographical and in-text citations. 
 
 
 
 3
 IV.

A
Class
Discussion
(5
minutes)
providing
a
summary
of
your
 Literature
Review
and
Action
Plan:
 
 
 • Presenter’s Name • A
Creative
Title

 • Research
Topic
or
Problem
 • Research
Questions
(minimum
of
3)
 
 
 The
Literature
Review
 
 • A
Review
of
Research
Method
and
Disciplinary
Areas
of
Focus
 (must
bridge
at
least
two
disciplines
or
fields,
preferable
three)
 • Most
helpful
sources
and
why
 • Synthesis,
Analysis
of
Findings
 
 
 An
Action
Plan
 
 • A
proposed
Action
Plan
with
Specific
Recommendations
for
 addressing
your
research
problem

 
 
 V.

What
is
an
Action
Plan?
 
 An
Action
Plan
follows
a
systematic
inquiry
that
includes:
 
 1)
an
analysis
of
the
problem,

 2)
an
analysis
of
what
is
being
done
about
it
(or
not),

 
 and
then
proposes
 
 3)
specific
actions
or
recommendations
about
how
the
problem
might
 best
be
addressed,
how
current
actions
might
be
improved
or
changed.

 
 An
Action
Plan
is
collaborative
(you
explore
what
others
are
already
doing
to
 address
the
problem),
critical
of
its
findings
(“How”
is
the
problem
being
 address?
Is
it
working?
What
is
working
well
and
what
is
not?),
and
creative
 
 4
 (you
are
now
sufficiently
informed
to
propose
possibilities
for
improvement
 and/or
different
approaches).
Action
Research
does
not
take
authoritative
 answers
at
face
value,
but
reflects
on
and
analyzes
the
credibility
of
its
 findings.
And,
it
has
a
practical
purpose
beyond
research
and
analysis— change‐‐an
important
step
in
addressing
socio‐political
problems
that
affect
 real
people.

 
 Action
Research
is
initially
a
reflective
or
discursive
investigation
of
an
 individual
or
groups’
interests,
questions,
problem,
or
challenge,
which
takes
 shape
as
the
collaborative
team
or
individual
formulate(s)
a
central
cluster
of
 questions.
The
problem
and
questions
are
then
explored
through
research.
If
 research
is
being
carried
as
a
team,
the
group
reconvenes,
shares
research
 findings,
and
develops
a
review
of
the
researched
literature
(a
Literature
 Review)
that
addresses
the
team
or
individual’s
stated
interests,
questions,
 problem,
and
findings.
Sometimes
the
problem
and
questions
change
based
on
 research
findings.
The
group
or
individual
then
propose(s)
an
Action
Plan
that
 addresses
a
key
aspect
of
the
research
problem.

 
 
 More
on
Action
Plans?
 
 Action
Plans,
both
collaborative
and
individual,
work
well
in
appropriately
 sized
seminars
(no
more
than
25)
with
highly
motivated
members
such
as
 honors
students,
in
interdisciplinary
courses
where
individuals
come
from
a
 range
of
disciplines
and
methodologies,
and
in
courses
where
professors
 facilitate
student‐engaged
peer
and
active
learning.

 
 The
Action
Plan
ultimately
results
in
recommendations
for
some
specific
 ways
to
improve
the
situation
or
solve
the
problem
being
addressed.
 Action
Plans
might
address
economic
systems,
public
policy,
legal
guidelines,
 state
and
federal
laws,
community
efforts,
public
relations,
educational
 programs,
foundations,
federal,
or
state
grant
funding,
congressional
 legislation,
and
so
on.

 
 
 
 ...
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This note was uploaded on 02/20/2010 for the course ENGINEERIN 242 211 taught by Professor Tessier during the Spring '10 term at UMass (Amherst).

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