GilbertK Lab5

GilbertK Lab5 - University of Denver Dr Keables NATS 1201 Environmental Systems Name_Kayla Gilbert Lab Day/Time Lab Exercise 5 Atmospheric Humidity

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University of Denver NATS 1201 Dr. Keables Environmental Systems Name:___Kayla Gilbert___ Lab Day/Time:______________________ Lab Exercise 5 Atmospheric Humidity Create a Word document for your answers and save it under the filename LastnameFirstinitial_Lab5.doc. Be sure to answer all of the questions in your answer document; please cut and paste the questions from this document to your answer document. Purpose. This lab exercise is designed to provide you with an opportunity to experiment with concepts concerning atmospheric humidity, relative humidity, cloud formation, and orographic lifting and the adiabatic process. Humidity. Humidity is the term used to describe the water vapor content of the atmosphere. There are a number of different ways to express humidity, and some of the more common ones are described below. Specific humidity . Specific humidity is an expression of the mass of water vapor that exists within one kilogram of air. The units are therefore grams per kilogram. Table 1 contains data for various expressions of humidity as a function of air temperature. The air temperature determines the maximum quantity of water vapor that can exist within a given air sample. Table 1. Saturation Humidities for Various Air Temperatures Temperature ( o C) Specific Humidity (g/kg) Absolute Humidity (g/m 3 ) Vapor Pressure (mb) 0 3.5 4.8 6.1 5 5.0 6.8 8.7 10 7.0 9.4 12.3 15 10.0 12.8 17.0 20 14.0 17.3 23.4 25 20.0 23.0 31.7 30 26.5 30.4 42.4 35 35.0 39.6 56.2 40 47.0 51.1 73.8 1. What can you say about the relationship between air temperature and saturation specific humidity? a. Specific humidity seems to go up linearly as temperature increases.
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2. Does the rate of change of water vapor capacity remain the same as the temperature increases? a. No, it moves proportionally to the temperature increases. Absolute humidity
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This note was uploaded on 02/20/2010 for the course NATS 1201 taught by Professor Keables during the Spring '08 term at Denver.

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GilbertK Lab5 - University of Denver Dr Keables NATS 1201 Environmental Systems Name_Kayla Gilbert Lab Day/Time Lab Exercise 5 Atmospheric Humidity

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