ch16 - Chapter 16 Waves and Sound 16.1 The Nature of Waves...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–15. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 16 Waves and Sound
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
16.1 The Nature of Waves 1. A wave is a traveling disturbance. 1. A wave carries energy from place to place.
Background image of page 2
16.1 The Nature of Waves Transverse Wave
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
16.1 The Nature of Waves Longitudinal Wave
Background image of page 4
16.1 The Nature of Waves Water waves are partially transverse and partially longitudinal.
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
16.2 Periodic Waves Periodic waves consist of cycles or patterns that are produced over and over again by the source. In the figures, every segment of the slinky vibrates in simple harmonic motion, provided the end of the slinky is moved in simple harmonic motion.
Background image of page 6
16.2 Periodic Waves In the drawing, one cycle is shaded in color. The amplitude A is the maximum excursion of a particle of the medium from the particles undisturbed position. The wavelength is the horizontal length of one cycle of the wave. The period is the time required for one complete cycle. The frequency is related to the period and has units of Hz, or s -1 . T f 1 =
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
16.2 Periodic Waves λ f T v = =
Background image of page 8
16.2 Periodic Waves Example 1 The Wavelengths of Radio Waves AM and FM radio waves are transverse waves consisting of electric and magnetic field disturbances traveling at a speed of 3.00x10 8 m/s. A station broadcasts AM radio waves whose frequency is 1230x10 3 Hz and an FM radio wave whose frequency is 91.9x10 6 Hz. Find the distance between adjacent crests in each wave. λ f T v = = f v =
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
16.2 Periodic Waves AM m 244 Hz 10 1230 s m 10 00 . 3 3 8 = × × = = f v λ FM m 26 . 3 Hz 10 91.9 s m 10 00 . 3 6 8 = × × = = f v
Background image of page 10
16.3 The Speed of a Wave on a String The speed at which the wave moves to the right depends on how quickly one particle of the string is accelerated upward in response to the net pulling force. L m F v = tension linear density
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
16.3 The Speed of a Wave on a String Example 2 Waves Traveling on Guitar Strings Transverse waves travel on each string of an electric guitar after the string is plucked. The length of each string between its two fixed ends is 0.628 m, and the mass is 0.208 g for the highest pitched E string and 3.32 g for the lowest pitched E string. Each string is under a tension of 226 N. Find the speeds of the waves on the two strings.
Background image of page 12
16.3 The Speed of a Wave on a String High E ( 29 ( 29 s m 826 m 0.628 kg 10 0.208 N 226 3 - = × = = L m F v Low E ( 29 ( 29 s m 207 m 0.628 kg 10 3.32 N 226 3 - = × = = L m F v
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
16.3
Background image of page 14
Image of page 15
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 46

ch16 - Chapter 16 Waves and Sound 16.1 The Nature of Waves...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 15. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online