ch27 - Chapter 27 Interference and the Wave Nature of Light...

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Unformatted text preview: Chapter 27 Interference and the Wave Nature of Light 27.1 The Principle of Linear Superposition When two or more light waves pass through a given point, their electric fields combine according to the principle of superposition. The waves emitted by the sources start out in phase and arrive at point P in phase, leading to constructive interference. , 3 , 2 , 1 , 1 2 = =- m m λ 27.1 The Principle of Linear Superposition The waves emitted by the sources start out in phase and arrive at point P out of phase, leading to destructive interference. ( 29 , 3 , 2 , 1 , 2 1 1 2 = + =- m m λ 27.1 The Principle of Linear Superposition If constructive or destructive interference is to continue ocurring at a point, the sources of the waves must be coherent sources . Two sources are coherent if the waves they emit maintain a constant phase relation. 27.2 Young’s Double Slit Experiment In Young’s experiment, two slits acts as coherent sources of light. Light waves from these slits interfere constructively and destructively on the screen. 27.2 Young’s Double Slit Experiment The waves coming from the slits interfere constructively or destructively, depending on the difference in distances between the slits and the screen. 27.2 Young’s Double Slit Experiment 27.2 Young’s Double Slit Experiment θ sin d = ∆ Bright fringes of a double-slit Dark fringes of a double-slit , 3 , 2 , 1 , sin = = m d m λ θ ( 29 , 3 , 2 , 1 , sin 2 1 = + = m d m λ θ 27.2 Young’s Double Slit Experiment Example 1 Young’s Double-Slit Experiment Red light (664 nm) is used in Young’s experiment with slits separated by 0.000120 m. The screen is located a distance 2.75 m from the slits....
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This note was uploaded on 02/20/2010 for the course PHYSC 210 taught by Professor Uscinski during the Summer '09 term at American.

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ch27 - Chapter 27 Interference and the Wave Nature of Light...

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