Long Night's Journey Into Day

Long Night's Journey Into Day - 9/24/08 Long Nights Journey...

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9/24/08 Long Night’s Journey Into Day Dr. William Dement compares sleep to oceanography. It is admirably vast but research on it is limited to simply probing around at the surface. Fortunately, with neuroscience advances, new technology, and a lot of new experiments, he was able to come to a definition on sleep. There are two essential features of sleep that cannot be applied to any other state of being. The most important feature is that when we are asleep, we are totally unconscious and we’re unaware of our surroundings, as if there were a wall between the perceptions of our brain and the outside world. Sleep is also reversible. We have all experienced this when persistent or strong stimulations have caused us to wake up. Sleep is thus unlike death or hypnosis. We can conclude also that sleep occurs naturally and periodically, ruling out other instances such as hibernation or being under anesthesia. The moment one falls asleep is when the brain no longer perceives the happenings
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This note was uploaded on 02/21/2010 for the course CHEM 11003 taught by Professor Stacy during the Fall '08 term at University of California, Berkeley.

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Long Night's Journey Into Day - 9/24/08 Long Nights Journey...

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