Lecture 4-Outline - Experimental Psychology Learning...

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Experimental Psychology- Learning Lecture 4 Outline II. Key Concepts A. Elicited Behaviors vs. Classical Conditioning (Twitmyerian Conditioning) Elicited behaviors are simple processes: -Involve changes in one’s repertoire -Do not involve learning new responses Classical Conditioning is more complex: -Organism learns relationships between stimuli -New behavioral responses are learned -Novel associations increase survival (FINAL CAUSE) B. Historical Context 1. Ivan Pavlov (1849-1936) Dogs increased stomach juices with the sight of food “Psychic juices” sold to the public- try to sell these juices to aid in digestion Beginning to associate sight of food with consumption of that food (appetitive and consummatory behaviors) 2. Edwin Twitmyer (1873-1943) Rang a bell just prior to hitting the patellar tendon (knee) The bell become sufficient to elicit knee-jerk reflexes 3. S.G Vul’fson and T. Snarskii- The Pavlov Contingent Orosensory stimuli - substances that produce a distinct texture and taste Meat powder, sand, sour water Once experienced their sight caused salivation To manipulate these salivary responses, other stimuli were paired Done with puppies C. Basic Paradigm 1. Unconditioned Stimulus (food) 2. Unconditioned Response (salivation) 3. Conditioned Stimulus (tuning fork) 4. Conditioned Response (salivation) -Neutral Stimulus- (tuning fork) Before conditioning- food response is salivation then tuning fork introduced and there is no response- conditioned stimulus begins its life doing nothing then they put the tuning fork with the food and there is salivation and after conditioning the tuning fork leads to salivation III. Experimental Paradigms Modern classical conditioning paradigms with animals:
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