lecture6_key - Lecture 6 study questions: 1. Explain what...

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Lecture 6 study questions: 1. Explain what happens to red blood cells in hypotonic, isotonic and in hypertonic solutions. Isotonic: The solutions being compared have equal concentration of solutes. Hypertonic: The solution with the higher concentration of solutes. Hypotonic: The solution with the lower concentration of solutes. When red blood cells are placed in a 0.9% salt solution, they neither gain nor lose water by osmosis. Such a solution is said to be isotonic . Blood serum is isotonic with respect to the cytoplasm, and red cells in that solution assume the shape of a biconcave disk. If the concentration of water in the medium surrounding a cell is greater than that of the cytosol, the medium is said to be hypotonic . Water enters the cell by osmosis. A red blood cell placed in a hypotonic solution (e.g., pure water) bursts immediately ("hemolysis") from the influx of water. If red cells are placed in hypertonic solution they lose water by osmosis and the cells shrivel up. 2. What is the chemical basis to that phenomenon?
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This note was uploaded on 02/21/2010 for the course IB 132 taught by Professor Brooks during the Spring '08 term at University of California, Berkeley.

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lecture6_key - Lecture 6 study questions: 1. Explain what...

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