LIGN 7 Lecture Notes

LIGN 7 Lecture Notes - LIGN7LectureNotes WhatisASLrelatedto?

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
LIGN 7 Lecture Notes 19/10/2009 10:04:00 What is ASL related to? The Historical Path of ASL Catholic Church: belief that the souls of the deaf, dumb, and mute must be  saved through confession and that language is essential to humanity. L’Abbe de L’Epee Institution Nationale de Sourder-Muets , 1760 Gesture to Sign Co-speech gesture 90% of speech is accompanied by gesture and increases with linguistic  development. Types of gestures: pointing, beats/batons, iconics, emblems. These gestures indicate breaks, beats, emphasis, etc. Some gestures  indicate actions. Emblems = vocabulary words, ex: shaking head means no,  finger to lips means quiet. Homesign Not ASL- gestures are unique to families, friends, and the individual.  Especially in profoundly deaf children to communicate with family using  pointing and gestures. Thomas Gallaudet c. 1716 Minister, lived in London and Paris, married to Alice Cogswell
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Laurent Clerc c. 1816 Pupil of Sicard, educated at Royal Institute, 1 st  deaf teacher in U.S. Hartford, Connecticut Teacher from France helped develop common signs, leading to cognates: French Sign Language vs. American Sign Language Cognates: laugh, help, liar Non-cognates: punish, habit, president HS Minimal Pairs Candy – Jealous Home – Yesterday Dumb – original meaning = mute.
Background image of page 2
LIGN 7 10-19-09 12/4/2009 11:37:00 AM Signs Have Parts – The Structural Properties of Signs Week 4, lecture 1 HS Minimal Pairs - very slight difference (one feature) between words Example: Skin and skim ASL: Candy and jealous / home and yesterday differing in handshape , name and egg /  cat and Indian differing in movement , bird and newspaper / rubber and doll differing in  location , socks and star / train and short orientation Sign Parameters / Sub-Lexical Structure Movement Sequences Notice: outward  motion from head to extended hand Deaf: inward  from chin to cheek Send: hand closed to open Sleep: fingers open to closed Ask: handshape moved downward Give up: raise open-palm hands upward What are the units of signs? Stokoe, 1960 - Gallaudet University Dictionary of American Sign Language Signs are organized by parts: HS = handshape
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
LOC = location MOV = movement ASL borrows from English Sub-Lexical Structure Cross-Linguistic Variation Visual Field & Sign Language Perception
Background image of page 4
LIGN 7 10-26-09 12/4/2009 11:37:00 AM ASL Verb Types
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Inflecting Verbs Verbs Across Languages English verbs give little information about sentence structure Meaning Tense 3 rd -person singular/plural Spanish verbs are marked for subject Endings show subject form
Background image of page 6
Image of page 7
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 02/21/2010 for the course LIGN LIGN 7 taught by Professor Mayberry during the Fall '09 term at UCSD.

Page1 / 27

LIGN 7 Lecture Notes - LIGN7LectureNotes WhatisASLrelatedto?

This preview shows document pages 1 - 7. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online