LS II Lab #2 Discussion

LS II Lab #2 Discussion - Discussion In this experiment,...

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Discussion In this experiment, different photosynthetic organisms were observed to further understand physical aspects of pigments. Environmental conditions regarding the presence or absence of how light may affect the pigments in barley were observed. In addition, 4 other photosynthesizers were compared to further understand the evolution of pigments. Comparisons between barley grown in light and dark environments and other photosynthesizers were made via TLC and spectrophotometry to determine which type of barley has more pigment. After much comparison of R f values and spectras, light grown barley has more pigments than dark grown barley, thus accepting the hypothesis. During the first half of the experiment, environmental effects on pigment composition was tested. Here, light grown barley and dark grown barley were compared. After the TLC was taken, 4 spots appeared for each barley. For the light grown barley, the first three R f were 0.41, 0.63, and 0.79 corresponding to xanthophyll, and the last spot was 0.90 corresponding to chlorophyll b. From table 1, the absorption wavelengths for the light grown barley occurred at 475 nm for xanthophyll and/ or β- Carotene, 680 nm for chlorophyll a, and 440 nm for chlorophyll b. The R f values for dark grown barley was 0.39, 0.59, and 0.77 corresponding to xanthophyll, and 0.94 for chlorophyll a. From table 1, absorption wavelengths for the dark grown barley occurred at 475 nm for xanthophyll, and 440 nm for chlorophyll a. More absorption wavelengths for light grown barley appeared than dark grown barley, thus, proving that light grown barley has more pigments than dark grown barley. Although dark grown barley was grown independent of light, chlorophyll a and xanthophyll still appeared on the TLC plate along with the spectrophotometry spectra. If in fact the barley was grown in the dark, one would think the use for pigments would be rendered ineffective due to the lack of light being absorbed.
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LS II Lab #2 Discussion - Discussion In this experiment,...

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