Ch_14 - COMD 2050 Chapter 14: First Language Acquisition...

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COMD 2050 Chapter 14: First Language Acquisition
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Acquisition There is an innate predisposition to acquire language (Chomsky’s view), but the child has to be given opportunities to interact with language users in order to develop it.
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Acquisition What is important for theories of first language acquisition is that Chomsky’s claim that the mental faculty for language “grows” (like the legs do) underestimates the importance of cultural transmission.
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Acquisition 2 requirements for first language acquisition: The child must be physically capable of sending and receiving language signals. The child must have frequent opportunities to interact with other language users.
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Caretaker speech/Motherese speech which is characterized : simplified words and sentence structures repetition frequent questions exaggerated intonation. Parents treat their children’s utterances as being meaningful and important even when they are unintelligible, this teaches the child the interactional function of language (that language is a way of sharing emotions and forming relationships with others).
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Caretaker speech/Motherese Caretaker speech does become more complex as the child acquires more language. Examples: mama, tummy Daddy push choochoo?
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Basic stages of language acquisition Pre-language stages Cooing Babbling True Language One word/ holophrastic stage Two-word stage Telegraphic speech
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Cooing First recognizable sounds the child produces Usually happens from 3 to 6 months of age Sounds are usually velar (/k/, /g/) and high vowels (i/, /u/)
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Babbling Usually starts around 6 months when the child starts to sit up Starts producing different types of sounds including fricatives, nasals and other vowels (/mu/, /da/) Around 9 months the babbling becomes more sophisticated and a lot of it seems like sound play, the child is experimenting with how to make sounds and
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This note was uploaded on 02/21/2010 for the course COMD 2050 taught by Professor Collins during the Spring '08 term at LSU.

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Ch_14 - COMD 2050 Chapter 14: First Language Acquisition...

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