Ch_18_19

Ch_18_19 - COMD2050 Chapter18: Languageandregionalvariation...

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COMD 2050 Chapter 18: Language and regional variation
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Standard English Standard English is the form of English that is: Used in newspapers and books Taught in schools Used by the mass media Taught to native speakers of other languages
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Accent v. Dialect Accent:  the description of aspects of pronunciation and  intonation which identify where an individual  speaker is from, regionally or socially. Dialect:  a more general term referring to pronunciation  patterns and the features of grammar and  vocabulary that are particular to a given variety of  a language.
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Dialect A  dialect  is a systematic variety of a language  specific to a particular region or social class. An  idiolect  is the specific linguistic system of a  particular speaker. Dialectology  is used to distinguish between two  different dialects of the same language and two  different languages. The rule of thumb is that different dialects are  mutually intelligible but different languages are not.
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Regional Dialects Stereotypic dialects and stereotypic  pronunciations In dialect surveying it is important to  identify  acceptable formants: NORMS ‘non-mobile, older, rural, male speakers’
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Linguistic Atlases Developed in the early 1900s Show the distribution of dialects by identifying  consistent features of speech in various regions Outdated because they often used NORMS
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Isogloss An  isogloss  is a line drawn to represent a  boundary between areas with regard to a  linguistic term
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Dialect boundary When linguists found that a lot of isoglosses  overlapped in a certain area, indicating that the  groups in the two regions had a lot of differences  in terms of vocabulary and pronunciation, they  drew a solid line to indicate a  dialect boundary .
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Dialectal continuum There is a  dialectal continuum  – people who  live close to a dialect boundary are more likely to  have characteristics of both dialects in their  speech than those who live far from the  boundary. Some people are aware of the dialect differences 
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Ch_18_19 - COMD2050 Chapter18: Languageandregionalvariation...

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