Chem 243a - Hydrogenation of a Fatty Acid

Chem 243a - Hydrogenation of a Fatty Acid - 6A:...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
6A: Hydrogenation of a Fatty Acid Antonio Alarcon Chem 243a 10/05/07 I. Abstract In this lab, the hydrogenation of methyl oleate into methyl stearate was performed. The synthesized methyl stearate had a melting point very close to the known literature value (36-38 ° C, 39 ° C respectively), a high % yield of , semi-solid consistency, as well as a negative result from the bromine/DCM test
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
II. Introduction In this lab, a hydrogenation of a fatty acid was preformed in which methyl oleate was converted to methyl stearate. This organic reaction involved two main processes, hydrogenation and recrystallization; both of which involve the saturation and recovery of single bonds from an unsaturated double bond structure. Overall, both saturated and unsaturated structures seem very similar. Both, in general, have relatively the same melting points and overall molecular formula (slight deviation within the amount of hydrogens). Yet, however similar both might seem, these “sight” deviations between saturated and unsaturated structures determine their overall respective behaviors. Saturated hydrocarbon chains, as the name suggests, implies full saturation of hydrogen atoms, thus leaving no double bonds. Unsaturated hydrocarbon chains, as the name suggests, implies impartial saturation of hydrogen atoms, thus leaving double bonds. Yet, on the molecular level, what influence do both saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbon chains have upon their overall chemical behavior? In general, the chemical behaviors of both are entirely dependent in how both saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbon chains interact with themselves. Due to double bonding, unsaturated hydrocarbon chains are unable to stack and/or build up on themselves, therefore remaining as a liquid at room temperature. In contrast, saturated hydrocarbon chains are able to stack and/or build up on themselves due to the absence of such double bonding, therefore remaining as a semi-solid margarine at room temperature. (A good way to picture the above saturated/unsaturated behavior is to envision the game Tetris; unsaturated chains being unfavorable shapes, saturated chains being favorable shapes ). In general, the conversion of methyl oleate to methyl stearate is a simple process.
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/03/2008 for the course CHEM 243A taught by Professor Bharadwaj during the Fall '08 term at University of Arizona- Tucson.

Page1 / 6

Chem 243a - Hydrogenation of a Fatty Acid - 6A:...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online