Project Formatting - Discussion, Conclusions, References....

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chemistry 120A Project Formatting Guidelines The following formatting guidelines should be followed in writing your project. Remember, this is a formal report worth 15% of your grade, and should be written similar to any formal lab report you have done in college. Improper format will result in loss of points. 1. No colloquialisms 2. Wikipedia is never an acceptable reference for a formal report. Do not use it. 3. At lease one (and preferably more) journal articles should be used as sources, and included in the references section 4. General Chemistry and Organic Chemistry textbooks (such as those used in Chem1A, Chem3A) should not be used as a main reference. Books at or above the level of this class (Advanced Organic, Inorganic, Physical Chemistry) are acceptable. 5. Sections should be presented in the following order : Abstract, Introduction, Methods, Results,
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Discussion, Conclusions, References. 6. Each section should be separate, and clearly indicate with the section title (i.e. Abstract before the abstract, etc.) 7. References are to be done in proper ACS format (see the ACS Style Guide, or see how references are done in an ACS journal article), and placed in a section at the end of the paper. 8. The references section should be a numbered list. When referring to a reference in your project, use a superscript number that corresponds to that reference in the references section. 9. Include a drawing of the reaction, structure, or mechanism you are investigating. This can be done with software such as ChemDraw or ChemSketch 10. All gures and tables should be numbered (i.e. Figure 1, Table 1), and have gure/table caption 1...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 02/22/2010 for the course CHEM N/A taught by Professor Head-gordon during the Spring '09 term at University of California, Berkeley.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online