Lab1 - Lab Exercise I ISE 3424 Discrete-Event Simulation...

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Unformatted text preview: Lab Exercise I ISE 3424 Discrete-Event Simulation Pasupathy, Spring 2010 In this lab exercise, we will understand the Monty Hall problem, modeled on the famous gameshow Lets Make a Deal , using a simulation in Excel. Suppose you are on a gameshow, where the stage is equipped with three doors numbered , 1 , and 2. Behind exactly one of these doors is a car. Behind the other two doors are goats. Only the gameshow host knows where the car is located. Assume that you get to keep what you find behind the door you choose to open. Also, assume that you like cars much more than goats! The gameshow host asks you to choose a door to open. Once you have made your choice, he walks over to one of the two unchosen doors, and then opens that door which does not have the car behind it. In a situation where both unchosen doors have goats behind them, he picks one randomly. So, for instance, if you had picked Door 1, and the car was behind Door 1, the gameshow host would have opened either Door 2 or Door 3 at random. If youDoor 1, the gameshow host would have opened either Door 2 or Door 3 at random....
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This note was uploaded on 02/22/2010 for the course ISE 3424 taught by Professor Raghupasupathy during the Spring '10 term at Virginia Tech.

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Lab1 - Lab Exercise I ISE 3424 Discrete-Event Simulation...

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