ch_7_final_10_12_09

ch_7_final_10_12_09 - Chapter7 Memory...

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Chapter 7 Memory
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The Information-Processing View of  Memory Analogy between a computer and the workings of memory in the human brain. Information enters the system, is processed and coded in various ways, and is then stored.
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The Information-Processing View of  Memory The computer has a “buffer” – a temporary storage place for letters that you type faster than it can display them. This is akin to our sensory memory store
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The Information-Processing View of  Memory The computer has RAM, or random-access memory, for temporary storage of information that has not yet been written to the hard drive. This information is still vulnerable to damage or loss. (short-term, or working, memory)
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The Information-Processing View of  Memory The computer has a hard drive, in which information that you are writing or entering can be permanently stored. (This is like our long-term memory)
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The Information-Processing View of  Memory The sensory store Although it is probably more accurately described as a combination of memory and perception, the sensory store is considered to be the first stage of memory processing. It is a very brief (less than a second) stage that registers everything that is perceived in the moment that we call “now.”
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Figure 7.5 Figure 7.5 George Sperling (1960) flashed arrays like this on a screen for 50 milliseconds. After the display went off, a signal told the viewer which row to recite.
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The Information-Processing View of  Memory Short-term and long-term memory Temporary storage of information that someone has just encountered is short-term memory. Long-term memory is a relatively permanent storage of mostly meaningful information. Reminders or hints that help us to retrieve information from long-term memory are called retrieval cues.
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The Information-Processing View of  Memory Short-term memory If a friend asks you what was just said in class, and you were paying attention, you could repeat it, or something close to it. This is because you are being asked to recall something from short-term memory. If you were not paying attention, you would not recall it. Attention moves information from the sensory store to short-term memory.
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Table 7.3 Table 7.3 : Sensory Store, Short-Term Memory, and Long-Term Memory
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The Information-Processing View of  Memory Long-term memory If your psychology instructor asks you to name the function of the thalamus, your first reaction might be to panic because you have no idea. The instructor says, “It has something to do with sensory information, right?”
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Memory Long-term memory Then it begins to come back to you – the thalamus is a relay and integration station for sensory information on its way to the cerebral cortex. The instructor gave you a hint that functioned as an
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This note was uploaded on 02/22/2010 for the course PSY 22518 taught by Professor Dr.chrismayhorn during the Fall '09 term at N.C. State.

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ch_7_final_10_12_09 - Chapter7 Memory...

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