ch4_sens&perc_09_04_09

ch4_sens&perc_09_04_09 - ReviewoftheWeek Pieces of...

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Review of the Week Pieces of Mind http://media.nclive.org.www.lib.ncsu.edu:2048/ Action potential animation http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SCasruJT-DU Neurotransmitter animation http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=90cj4NX87Yk
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What you sense/see is not  always  what  you get!  Are you ticklish? Avengers! Rub your eyes (except for contact lens wearers.)
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Chapter 4 Sensation and Perception
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Sensation and Perception Module 1: Vision Sensation is the conversion of energy from the environment into a pattern of response by the nervous system. Perception is the interpretation of that information.
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The Detection of Light Light is the stimulus that the visual system is designed to detect. Visible light is just one very small portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, which is the continuum of all the frequencies of radiated energy. The human eye is designed to detect energy in the wavelengths from 400 to 700 nm.
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Figure 4.2 Figure 4.2 The lens gets its name from Latin for lentil, referring to its shape—an appropriate choice, as this cross section of the eye shows. The names of other parts of the eye also refer to their appearance.
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The Structure of the Eye The pupil is an adjustable opening in the eye through which light enters. The iris is the structure on the surface of the eye, surrounding the pupil, and containing the muscles that make the pupil dilate or constrict. Gives your eye its characteristic color , too.
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The Structure of the Eye The cornea is a rigid, transparent structure on the very outer surface of the eyeball. It focuses light by directing it through the pupil. Light goes through the pupil, directed to the lens. Lens - flexible structure, varies in thickness, enables eye to accommodate, adjust its focus for objects at different distances.
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The Structure of the Eye Vitreous humor – Clear jellylike substance at the back of the eyeball to which light is directed by the lens At the back of the eye is the retina , the structure containing the visual receptors.
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The Visual Receptors Rods and Cones - Specialized neurons Rods – more numerous than cones, ~90- 95%, dim light; periphery (dark room demonstration) Cones – represent ~5-10% of visual receptors; color vision, daytime, detail
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The Visual Receptors Fovea – Center of the human retina, and the location of the highest proportion of cones. Greatest acuity Rods more plentiful in periphery of retina
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The process of gradual improvement in the ability to see in the dark. Requires 1-2 minutes for most.
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This note was uploaded on 02/22/2010 for the course PSY 22518 taught by Professor Dr.chrismayhorn during the Fall '09 term at N.C. State.

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ch4_sens&perc_09_04_09 - ReviewoftheWeek Pieces of...

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