Cultural_Web_B - nce ion Ttant The of a s or ivals f the...

Info icon This preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: nce ion Ttant The of a s, or ivals f the web l for ence ion. may )out Routines are ‘the way we do things around here on a day-to-day basis‘ Rituals are activities or events that emphasise, highlight or reinforce what is especially important in the culture Symbols are objects, events, acts or people that convey, maintain or create meaning over and above their functional purpose WHAT IS CULTURE AND WHY IS IT IMPORTANT? the centrality of news coverage and reporting. However, from a strategic point of View, increasingly newspapers’ revenues are reliant on advertising income and the strategy may need to be directed to this. The paradigm of a charity may be about doing good works for the needy: but this cannot be achieved if it is not run effectively for the purpose of raising money. So understanding what the paradigm is and how it informs debate on strategy matters. The problem is that, since it is unlikely to be talked about, trying to identify it can be difficult, especially if you are part of that organisation. Outside observers may find it relatively easy to identify simply by listening to what people say and watching what they do and emphasise, but this may not be so easy for insiders who are part of the culture. One way of ‘insiders’ getting to see the assumptions they take for granted is to focus initially on other aspects of the cultural web because these are to do with more visible manifestations of culture. Moreover these other aspects are likely to act to reinforce the assumptions within that paradigm. Routines are ’the way we do things around here’ on a day-to-day basis. These may have a long history and may well be common across organis— ations. At their best, these lubricate the working of the organisation, and may provide a distinctive organisational competence. However, they can also represent a taken—for—grantedness about how things should happen which. again, can be difficult to change. Rituals of organisational life are activities or events that emphasise, high— light or reinforce what is especially important in the culture. Examples include training programmes, interview panels, promotion and assessment procedures, sales conferences and so on. An extreme example, of course, is the ritualistic training of army recruits to prepare them for the discipline required in conflict. However, rituals can also be informal activities such as drinks in the pub after work or gossiping around photocopying machines. The stories8 told by members of an organisation to each other, to outsiders, to new recruits and so on, may act to embed the present in its organisational history and also flag up important events and personalities. They typically have to do with successes, disasters, heroes, villains and mavericks (who deviate from the norm). They can be a way of letting people know what is important in an. organisation. Symbols9 are objects, events, acts or people that convey, maintain or create meaning over and above their functional purpose. For example offices and office layout, cars and titles have a functional purpose, but are also typically signals about status and hierarchy. Particular people, may come to represent specially important aspects of an organisation or historic turning points. The form of language used in an organisation can also be particularly revealing, especially with regard to customers or clients. For example, the head of a consumer protection agency in Australia described his clients as 'com— plainers'. In a major teaching hospital in the UK, consultants described patients as ’clinical material'. Whilst such examples might be amusing, they ...
View Full Document

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern