Chap10_Sec3

Chap10_Sec3 - PARAMETRIC EQUATIONS POLAR COORDINATES 10.3...

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10.3 Polar Coordinates In this section, we will learn: How to represent points in polar coordinates. PARAMETRIC EQUATIONS & POLAR COORDINATES
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POLE, POLAR AXIS, POLAR COORDINATES We choose a point in the plane that is called the pole (or origin) and is labeled O. Then, we draw a ray (half-line) starting at O called the polar axis. This axis is usually drawn horizontally to the right corresponding to the positive x -axis in Cartesian coordinates. If P is any other point in the plane, let: r be the distance from O to P. θ be the angle (usually measured in radians) between the polar axis and the line OP. P is represented by the ordered pair ( r , θ ) . r , θ are called polar coordinates of P . We use the convention that an angle is: Positive—if measured in the counter- clockwise direction from the polar axis. Negative—if measured in the clockwise direction from the polar axis.
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CARTESIAN VS. POLAR COORDINATES In the Cartesian coordinate system, every point has only one representation. However, in the polar coordinate system, each point has many representations.
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This note was uploaded on 02/23/2010 for the course MATH 221 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at Tulane.

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Chap10_Sec3 - PARAMETRIC EQUATIONS POLAR COORDINATES 10.3...

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