Chap10_Sec1

Chap10_Sec1 - . Thus, we can interpret ( x , y ) = ( f ( t...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
10.1 Curves Defined by arametric Equations Parametric Equations In this section, we will learn about: Parametric equations and generating their curves.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
INTRODUCTION Imagine that a particle moves along the curve C shown here. s Can the curve C be described as an equation of the form y = f ( x )? However, the x - and y -coordinates of the particle are functions of time t . So, we can write x = f ( t ) and y = g ( t ) . The curve C is called a parametric curve
Background image of page 2
Background image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: . Thus, we can interpret ( x , y ) = ( f ( t ), g ( t )) as the position of a particle at time t . The parametric equations have an advantagethey tell us when the particle was at a point. They also indicate the direction of the motion. These are called parametric equations . Graphing devices are particularly useful when sketching complicated curves. For instance, these curves would be virtually impossible to produce COMPLEX CURVES by hand....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 02/23/2010 for the course MATH 221 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at Tulane.

Page1 / 3

Chap10_Sec1 - . Thus, we can interpret ( x , y ) = ( f ( t...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online