L2Q2 - LESSON 2: POP-ROCK OF THE 50S AND 60S REQUIRED...

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LESSON 2: POP-ROCK OF THE 50S AND 60S REQUIRED READING: Chapter 2 REQUIRED VIEWING: Time/Life History of Rock and Roll , Volume 2 ("Good Rockin' Tonight" on DVD Disc 1) PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES: Upon satisfactory completion of this section, you will have 1. seen how American Rock 'n' Roll became very conservative due to a variety of issues, including the sudden "loss" of several key Rock pioneers. 2. examined the " watering-down" of rock, as it was mass-marketed to whites. 3. understood the importance of Dick Clark, Don Kirschner and Berry Gordy to the rapid rise in Rock 'n' Roll's commercial popularity in the late 50s/early 60s. 4. explored a wide variety of "softer" rock styles, including Doo-Wop, Teen Idols, Girl Groups, Surf Music and Motown. COMMENTS, STUDY NOTES, KEY CONCEPTS AND TERMINOLOGY: After all the wild experimentation of 50s R & B and Rockabilly, it is surprising how rapidly Rock 'N' Roll makes its conservative about-face in the late 50s/early 60s. It is important to note, however, that without this "toning-down," Rock music could not have been so easily mass-marketed to America's teens. In particular, Dick Clark and his teen idols made Rock 'n' Roll respectable from the viewpoint of most parents, while Berry Gordy/Motown offered a more polished type of Black music that was equally attractive to whites. Also, keep in mind that the concept of "cover" recordings (for example, white artists such as Pat Boone doing "blanched" versions of Little Richard tunes) was not a case of "stealing" someone else's music. More often than not, the rights to those songs were owned by record companies, who wisely had such songs recorded by several
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artists—each of whom could attract a different niche of listeners. Pat Boone outsold Little Richard mainly because his "covers" were more like the " crooning" song styles of previously-popular singers such as Frank Sinatra and Nat "King" Cole, while Little Richard's lyrics/style/stage antics were extreme for that era. In the long run, Boone ultimately made Little Richard famous. You may also find it interesting to look at the "Top
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This note was uploaded on 02/23/2010 for the course MUS 1520 taught by Professor Jacobson during the Spring '06 term at Western Michigan.

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L2Q2 - LESSON 2: POP-ROCK OF THE 50S AND 60S REQUIRED...

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