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Dance 35 - Dance35 00:42:00 Dance in China vs African Dance...

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Dance 35 14/01/2009 00:42:00 Dance in China Noted from youtube” vs. African Dance Move hand movements (gestural – isolate part of body) o Smooth, flowing, uniform Much slower (tempo difference) Single unit spine Straight spine & flowing costume extremes o Extra sleeve = arms are important Line of the dance parallels the line of the language/writing style Use of masks Wind instruments/string instruments Solos and small groups Origins of dance in china 1 st millennium BC Civilian dance o Hold feathers ( distribution of harvest, hunting, fishing) Military dance o Hold weapons o Moved forward and backward in coordinated group motion Physical qualities
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o Choreographed hand and feet movements Express venerations of spirits of heaven and earth The Han Dynasty (206 BC – 220 AD) o Establishes a music bureau o Tasked with collecting regional folk and dance The Tang Dynasty (618 AD – 707 AD) o Culture becomes priority o Dance reaches a level of unprecedented brilliance o 10 movement music dance included a plot bright colors the takeoff point for Beijing Opera Regional Folk Dances The Miao (aka Hmong) in Southwest China – lively, antiphonal/responsive singing and competitive dance Taiwan – hand-holding line dance as a part of the harvest ritual Beijing Opera Traditional form of Chinese theatre Combined music, vocal, performance, mine, dance, and aerobatics….equally Originally appeared in 18 th century Intense costume and mask-like makeup No set blank stage
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Dance and acting are the same thing…symbolic and suggestive, broadly drawn/emotions (vs. specific) Characters are not specific – type of person Sheng – main male performers Lao:  conservative in dress and makeup (old male) Xiao: young male, makes foolish mistake, learns moral, etc. high shrill voice (voice changes throughout performance, symbolize growing up) Wu: hero! Always involves combat, fight with sticks on stage. One of the hardest dance roles, acrobatic Jing: painted face character (elaborate makeup) [wu jing – marshall arts] colored in red, loyalty or white-evil Chau – clown, play all secondary roles, comic relief, most connected to rhythm of orchestra, usually connect music to hardly ever sing, allowed to improvise Dan  – any female role. All originally played by men. “false foot” dance technique – way of moving developed by male to imitate women – like movements, elegant and graceful One older and one younger actress o Lao – older o Wu – warrior woman o Dao madan – young female warrior o Quingyi – virtuous and elite o Hua – unmarried o Hua shan – sensual + elite statues Performance Elements Song Combat Dance acting Aesthetics – suggestive, symbolic, high culture
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Broad characters -> more people can relate Asethic of moving body Dan – graceful, smooth, elegant Aspire to be like the character types (audience)
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