159_spring_08_chapt_13_secs_1_and

159_spring_08_chapt_13_secs_1_and - Chapter 13 The...

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Ch 13 1 The Properties of Mixtures: Solutions and Colloids Chapter 13
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Ch 13 2 The Properties of Mixtures: Solutions and Colloids 13.1 Types of Solutions: Intermolecular Forces and Predicting Solubility 13.2 Why Substances Dissolve: Understanding the Solution Process 13.4 Quantitative Ways of Expressing Concentration 13.5 Colligative Properties of Solutions 13.3 Solubility as an Equilibrium Process
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Ch 13 3 Solutions • A solution is formed when one substance dissolves in another •T h e s o l u t e dissolves in the solvent • The solubility (S) of a solute is the maximum amount that dissolves in a fixed quantity of a particular solvent at a specified temperature given that excess solute is present Ex/ (NaCl), S =39.12 g/100 mL water at 100 C Ex/ (AgCl), S=0.0021 g/100 mL water at 100 C
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Ch 13 4 Typical Exam Problem 3 For which of the following choices is the solute considered to be soluble in the solvent? Solute Solvent X. I 2 C 6 H 6 Y. KCl CCl 4 Z. CH 3 OH H 2 O
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Ch 13 5 Solution to Typical Exam Problem 3 X. I 2 is non-polar benzene is non-pola rI 2 is soluble in benzene Y. KCl is ionic CCl 4 is non-polar KCl is not soluble in CCl 4 Z. CH 3 OH is polar H 2 O is polar CH 3 OH is soluble in H 2 O Use this simple concept: LIKE DISSOLVES LIKE
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Ch 13 6 Figure The arrangement of atoms in two types of alloys. brass - a substitutional alloy carbon steel -an interstitial alloy C atom lies in the holes of the bcc crystal structure of Fe Solid-Solid Solutions Zn atom substitutes for Cu atom at Cu’s fcc packing sites
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This note was uploaded on 04/03/2008 for the course CHEM 159-160 taught by Professor Zbaida during the Fall '07 term at Rutgers.

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159_spring_08_chapt_13_secs_1_and - Chapter 13 The...

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