Lecture 5

Lecture 5 - Mediated Perception Although phenomenally we...

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Unformatted text preview: Mediated Perception Although phenomenally we see objects directly, with no process intervening, objectively the process is mediated. [We cannot maintain] that the perceived object is a photographic refection oF the real object. We have to say that the object in the environment and our experience oF it are two distinction, though related, events. Moskowitz 2005:64, citing Asch. at the level oF social liFe, what is called the adjustment oF man to his environment takes place through the medium oF ctionsBy ctions I do not mean liesThe range oF ction extends all the way From complete hallucination to the scientists perFectly selF-conscious use oF a schematic model A work oF ction may have any degree oF delity, and so long as the degree oF delity can be taken into account, ction is not misleading. Lippmann 1922: 10 Stereotypes as expectancies stereotypes are just expectancies that we hold about a category. Expectancies can range from speciFc information we know about (or think we know about) an individual, based on prior experience or hearsay about that individual, to more general type of information associated with the group or category to which that individual belongs. Stereotypes can be construed as category-based expectancies that we have learned from our own personal experiences and/or various socializing agents with the culturewe have expectancies about every person with whom we interact; therefore, no observattion, inference, or interaction us free from the inuence of expectancies that we bring to the person perception process. Moskowitz 2005:438 Stereotypes as expectancies Johann Caspar Lavatar Essays in Physiognomy Vol. II 1810 Stereotypes as expectancies Six Idiot Women Wedged between sections of Physiognomical Rules on Sophists, Knaves and Obstinacy preceding and Warts and Worthless InsigniFcance following are the sections on Women. Vanity or pride is the general characteristic of all women. Essays on Physiognomy 481 Stereotypes as expectancies Expectancies are: beliefs about a future state of affairs - beliefs drawn from past experience about the future probabilities that some set of future events will come to pass. This bridge from the past to the future is what makes expectancies so central to everyday interaction. Moskowitz 2005:439 Assimilation to the familiar The familiar will always remain the likely starting point for the rendering of the unfamiliar; an existing representation will always exert it spell over the artist even while he strives to record the truth. Gombrich 82 The shaping effects of stereotypes We not only have a tendency to rely on schemas when deciding whether to agree with others; we also tend to see information as skewed in a way that supports what we already believe to be true....
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Lecture 5 - Mediated Perception Although phenomenally we...

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