Lecture 10

Lecture 10 - The basic question Who is saying what to whom...

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The basic question Who is saying what to whom, under what conditions, with what intent, and with what result? excerpt from Ford recall notice “Continued driving with a failed bearing could result in the disengagement of the axle shaft and adversely affect vehicle control.” What does this mean? Why was it written this way, instead of simply saying?: “Our engineers have discovered a serious problem that has been to affect vehicle control that demands immediate response by car-owners.”
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The paradox of puffery Language or images used that are so exaggerated or vague that a rational person would give them no credibility with respect to the purchase of the advertised product. But, if no rational person would be affected by the language or images, why would billions of dollars be spent crafting ads so full of puffery? There can be harmless implicatures ( = implied messages) or harmful ones.
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Truth and deception Some ads can be true and, yet, deceptive: Mechanical Tonka truck ad on children’s Saturday morning television
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Lecture 10 - The basic question Who is saying what to whom...

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