chem107f09wk5s

chem107f09wk5s - Properties of Gases Chp 5.1 Gases do not...

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Unformatted text preview: Properties of Gases Chp. 5.1 Gases do not have definite volume or definite shape. Gases have very low densities. Gas densities vary with conditions. Gases mix with one another readily. Gases change volume dramatically with changing temperature. P = F A Pressure Chp. 5.2 mm Hg torr Atmospheres (atm) Pascals (Pa) Kilo Pascals (kPa) Pounds per Square Inch (psi) Conversions 1 mm Hg = 1 torr 1 atm = 760 mm Hg 1 atm = 101.3 kPa 1 atm = 14.7 psi Units of Pressure Chp. 5.2 Convert 147.2 kPa to torr. Units of Pressure Chp. 5.2 sphygmanometer 120/80 Blood Pressure Chp. 5 Measuring Pressure Chp. 5.2 On a certain day the barometer in a laboratory indicates that the atmospheric pressure is 764.7 torr. A sample of gas is placed in a flask attached to an open-end mercury manometer. A meter stick is used to measure the height of the mercury above the bottom of the manometer. The level of mercury in the open-end arm of the manometer has a height of 136.4 mm, and the mercury in the arm that is in contact with the gas has a height of 103.8 mm. What is the pressure of the gas in atmospheres. Robert Boyle 1627-1691 Robert Boyle Chp. 5 Pressure ∝ 1/Volume Moles and Temperature are Constant Boyle’s Law Chp. 5.3 P 1 V 1 = P 2 V 2 at constant T, n Boyle’s Law Chp. 5.3 T ∝ V V 1 /T 1 = V 2 /T 2 at constant P and n Charles’s Law and Absolute Zero Chp. 5.3 K = 273.15 + o C-273 o C = 0 K = absolute zero Units of Temperature, Kelvin Chp. 5.3 A balloon originally had a volume of 4.39 L at 44 O C and a pressure of 729 torr. The balloon must be cooled to what temperature to reduce its volume to 3.78 L ( at constant pressure)....
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chem107f09wk5s - Properties of Gases Chp 5.1 Gases do not...

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