retina from eye - Extracting the Retina from the Eye A...

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Extracting the Retina from the Eye A typical procedure that is undergone at the Beckman Vision Center is extracting a thin piece of retina from the rest of the eye. This starts with using a scalpel to cut the eye in half. Only one half of the eye is used, the other half can be saved. There is now half an eye on the lab table which consists of three main layers; The Sclera (outmost layer), the Choroid (middle layer), and the Retina (inner layer). The Sclera is the white part of the eye that consists of tough fibers which protect the eye from penetration of sharp objects. The Choroid is the dark unreflective layer that contains blood vessels and connective tissue. This layer supplies nutrients to the inner part of the eye. The next layer is the retina; this is the layer that needs to be isolated. The retina contains the light receptors rods and cones. The cones are made up of three light receptors, one for each primary color (red, green, blue). The retina is comprised of seven layers; the pigment
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This note was uploaded on 02/23/2010 for the course ENGLISH 1011 taught by Professor Thompson during the Spring '07 term at University of California, Berkeley.

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retina from eye - Extracting the Retina from the Eye A...

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