Lecture%2026[1]

Lecture%2026[1] - HomericSociety:Mythand History...

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    Homeric Society: Myth and  History 04/13/09
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    Trojan War: End of the Heroic  Age Age of Heroes – final age of mythology;  precedes Hesiod’s contemporary Iron  Age Age of Heroes – ended by heroes killing  each other off in Trojan War Significance of the Death of Sarpedon
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    Death of Sarpedon, Book 16 “Fate has it that Sarpedon, whom I love  more than any man, is to be killed by  Patroclus. Shall I take him out of battle  while he still lives and set him down in the  rich land of Lycia, or shall I let him die  under Patroclus’ hands?” Same dilemma as for Thetis with Achilles
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    Hera’s Reply to Zeus  “A mortal man, whose fate has long been fixed,  and you want to save him from rattling death?  Do it. But don’t expect all of us to approve.  Listen to me. If you send Sarpedon home alive,  you will have to expect other gods to do the  same and save their own sons – and there are  many of them in this war around Priam’s great  city. Think of the resentment you will create.” 
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    Death of Sarpedon
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    Homer: Idealist or Realist? Idealizes the strength of the heroes Wounds and deaths described by beautiful  similes (e.g., the wound of Menelaus)   war  wounds/killings as art
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    The Wound of Menelaus, Book  4 “In Maeonia and Caria women stain ivory with  scarlet, to be cheek pieces for horses. Such a  piece will lie in a treasure chamber, and though  many horsemen pray to use it as an ornament  for the horse and glory for the driver, it lies  there as a king’s prize. That, Menelaus, was how your thighs were  stained with blood, and your fine shins and  ankles beneath.”
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    Homer as a Realist Effects of war on heroes – realistic Jonathan Shay –  Achilles in Vietnam http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?se
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    Shay on Homer ''The 'Iliad' and the 'Odyssey' depict the moral and social world that real soldiers inhabit. I thought this was something everyone knew. I wrote up the similarities only because I thought it was a good teaching piece, a way to think about this that clinicians could use to make sure they covered all the bases.'' Problem Shay sees in Homeric heroes: lack of  trust of heroes towards other heroes and  towards their troops. This lack of trust is  typical of PTSD.
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Lecture%2026[1] - HomericSociety:Mythand History...

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