CornellLibraryCollaborativeLearningComputerLaboratory

CornellLibraryCollaborativeLearningComputerLaboratory -...

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1 Defining, Measuring, and Improving Collaboration though Evaluating the Cornell Library Collaborative Learning Computer Laboratory Sophie Hwang Cornell University 4148 Cascadilla, Ithaca NY [email protected] Philip Karnofsky Cornell University 236A Carl Becker, Ithaca NY [email protected] ABSTRACT This paper addresses the following three-part question: how do we define, measure, and improve collaboration? We examine these concepts with a case study of the Cornell Library Collaborative Learning Computer Laboratory. In evaluating the classroom, we ask “Does the (CL)3 room facilitate collaboration?” This question is important for the Human-Computer Interaction community since the vast majority of research into Computer-Mediated Collaborative Learning focuses on group collaboration across networked computers or different physical locations. In this paper we test the effectiveness of CMCL principles for both evaluating collaborative learning in a common physical location, and for suggesting ways to encourage greater collaboration in the same space. INTRODUCTION Background Decades of research attest to the importance of user collaboration in learning environments. In a Computer- Mediated Collaborative Learning literature review by Hiltz et al [2], the authors present previous research which indicates the benefits of collaborative work. The CMCL community largely agrees that collaboration helps individuals learn better by both encouraging individuals to navigate through complex or new tasks, and providing gratification by increasing motivation and satisfaction with the learning process in general. It was with this research in mind that Cornell University set out to design the Cornell Library Collaborative Learning Computer Laboratory, also known as (CL)3. Cornell is one of the first academic institutions in the world to attempt to build a computer laboratory with the sole purpose of fostering collaboration. Laboratory Design The Cornell Library Collaborative Learning Computer Laboratory contains two whiteboards, eight workstations separated into two clusters, two tables, a projector and automatic drop-down screen. A ninth workstation is located in an elevated corner of the room beside the entrance. The workstations feature one CPU, two mice, two keyboards, and adjustable dual-monitors. Additionally, all workstations are completely mobile due to their wireless internet connections and portable battery supplies (Figure 1). The lab has been in operation for over a year, both for public use and group-based classes such as an Introductory Programming Workshop (CS100J AEW) and Game Design (CIS300 and CIS490/790). We set out to evaluate the plan’s execution. Research Question The high-level research question for this paper is the following: How do we define, measure, and improve collaboration? We will answer this question through our evaluation of the Cornell Library Collaborative Learning Computer Laboratory. Of specific interest to this study is whether the (CL)3 room
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This note was uploaded on 02/24/2010 for the course COMM 4400 at Cornell.

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CornellLibraryCollaborativeLearningComputerLaboratory -...

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